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lecture_8 - Einstein’s box The location of the CM of an...

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    Einstein’s box The location of the CM of an isolated system cannot be  changed by any process that occurs inside the system. Consider a box of length  L  that rests on a frictionless surface;  the mass  M  of the box is equally divided between its two ends. M/2 M/2 c v c x Radiation is absorbed  and box stops p = E c v =- E Mc x = v t = - E Mc L c EL Mc 2 mL + M x = 0 E = mc 2
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    Any change  E in the energy of a body implies a corresponding  change  m in its inertial mass, such that  E =c m.  The most important result of a general character to which the  special theory has led is concerned with the concept of mass.  Before the advent of relativity, physics recognized two  conservation laws of fundamental importance, namely, the law  of conservation of energy and the law of conservation of mass;  these two fundamental laws appeared to be quite independent of  each other. By means of the theory of relativity they have been  united into one law .” (Einstein, Relativity, 1961)
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lecture_8 - Einstein’s box The location of the CM of an...

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