Lab 2 Night Sky Motions & CS v6.docx - Jan21 Motions in the...

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Jan21Motions in the Nighttime Sky and the Celestial SphereBackgroundThroughout time, humans have created models of the nighttime sky to help them predict themotions within the nighttime sky as well as the Sun throughout the year. One of the earliestmodels, which is still used today, is the celestial sphere. A larger model is a (physical)planetarium where the nighttime sky is illuminated over your head. While these models are veryhelpful, they are not easy to transport. Thus various types of star maps and planispheres havealso been used over the ages. Now with technology, "planetarium software," apps, and web pagescan be used, such as Stellarium, Google Sky, and World Wide Telescope.Like all models, these are not perfect. Rather, they are intended to help us visualize what ishappening, and perhaps help us understand how or why. In this lab, we will be exploring at leastone of these models.InstructionsYou will need to read this lab completely. You will be presented with questions of various typesthat you will need to answer on the lab report that you will upload to eCampus once complete.The student should expect this lab to take 3 hours to complete.Section I: Motions in the Night SkyIn this section of the lab, you will be asked to go outside for observations of the nighttime sky.You will need scratch paper to help you with your observations. (Scratch paper will always befor thebenefitof the student and willnotbe turned-in.) As always, you will want to read alldirectionscarefullybefore proceeding.While the observations can be made from anywhere at any time during nighttime, it isrecommended that you choose a location that you are familiar with, and that has at least onedirection where you can see down to the horizon without barriers such as buildings, mountains,et cetera. Waitat least45 minutes after sundown to make your first observation. Then waitatleast1 hour after your first observation (andat least1 hour before sunrise) to make your secondobservation. Your observations will need to take place on the same night. You will need to besure you know with certainty the cardinal directions (north, east, south, west) from yourobservation location. You may find a smartphone or tablet app (like Google Sky or SkEye)helpful but not necessary. Your observations may each require up to 30 minutes for your eyes tobecome (mostly) dark-adjusted plus another 10 to 20 minutes to get set-up and record yourobservation.Part A: ObservationsObservation 1: You will need to make sure your viewing location is dark. Try to find a locationwith minimal lights (like the lights found in lit parking lots, along streets, or building lights). You
Night Sky and Celestial Spherewill also need to view on a night mostly free from clouds. You will need to check weatherforecasts to ensure the sky does not become cloudy during your window for observations. Face adirection where you can view the horizon, but preferably not north if viewing from Earth’snorthern hemisphere or south if viewing from Earth’s southern hemisphere. Using a piece ofscratch paper, make a drawing of the stars you see. Be sure to include all bright stars and planets.

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Term
Fall
Professor
N/A
Tags
Celestial coordinate system, questions of various types

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