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ENGR2405Ch2 - ENGR 2405 Chapter 2 Circuit Elements 1...

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1 ENGR 2405 Chapter 2 Circuit Elements
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2 Chapter 2 Homework #1 2.2, 2.8, 2.10, 2.16, 2.25, 2.29
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3 Powers of Ten Prefix Symbol Power atto a 10 -18 femto f 10 -15 pico p 10 -12 nano n 10 -9 micro μ 10 -6 milli m 10 -3 centi c 10 -2 deci d 10 -1 deka da 10 hecto h 10 2 kilo k 10 3 mega M 10 6 giga G 10 9 tera T 10 12
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4 Units Unit Symbol Coulomb (Q or q) C Current (I or i) A (Ampere) Seconds (s) s Voltage (V, E or e) V Power (P) W (Watts) Energy (W) J (Joules) Resistance (R) (Ohms)
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5 Coulomb one coulomb ( C ) = 6.242 x 10 18 * electrons flowing past a point on the copper wire for one second.
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6 Current Ampere (A) is the unit of current. One Ampere = one coulomb ( C ) flowing past a point on the copper wire for one second. The current in Amperes can be determined using the following equation: i(t) = current in amperes (A) q(t) = coulombs (C) t = time in seconds (s)
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7 Current – Ohms Law (Direct Current (DC) circuit) I = V / R Where, I = current (A) V = volts (V) R = Resistance ( ) Other Ohm’s Law Equations: V = IR And R = V/I
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8 Current Safety considerations Even small levels of current through the human body can cause serious, dangerous side effects Any current over 10 mA is considered dangerous currents of 50 mA can cause severe shock currents over 100 mA can be fatal Treat electricity with respect – not fear
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9 Voltage The applied potential difference (in volts) of a voltage source in an electric circuit is the “pressure” to set the system in motion and “cause” the flow of charge or current through the electrical system.
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10 Voltage A potential difference of 1 volt (V) exists between two points if 1 joule (J) of energy is exchanged in moving 1 coulomb (C) of charge between the two points.
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11 Voltage Equations The potential between points “a” and “b” in an electrical system is : d d V = IR Where, I = current (A) V = volts (V) R = Resistance ( )
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