Chapter 13 Quiz - Question 1 1 out of 1 points The extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability Selected Answer Fals e

Chapter 13 Quiz - Question 1 1 out of 1 points The extreme...

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Question 11 out of 1 pointsThe extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability.Selected Answer:FalseQuestion 21 out of 1 pointsPeople who keep domestic animals are strictly liable for any harm inflicted by the animals.Selected Answer:FalseQuestion 31 out of 1 pointsMisrepresentation in an ad is enough to show an intent to induce the reliance of anyone who may use the product.Selected Answer:TrueQuestion 41 out of 1 pointsManufacturers must use due care in selecting the materials to be used in a product.Selected Answer:TrueQuestion 51 out of 1 pointsA product liability action based on negligence does not require privity of contract between the injured plaintiff and the defendant-manufacturer.Selected Answer:TrueQuestion 61 out of 1 pointsManufacturers must use due care in inspecting and testing any purchased components used in a product.Selected Answer:TrueQuestion 71 out of 1 pointsThe law imposes strict product liability as a matter of public policy based in part on the assumption that manufacturers can better bear the costs associated with injuries caused by their products.Selected Answer:True
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Question 81 out of 1 pointsBecause many products cannot be made entirely safe for all uses, sellers or lessors are liable only for products that are unreasonably dangerous.Selected Answer:TrueQuestion 91 out of 1 pointsAn action in strict product liability requires that a product be in a defective condition caused by its purchaser.Selected Answer:FalseQuestion 101 out of 1 pointsThe doctrine of strict liability can be applied to sellers of goods, including manufacturers, but not distributors.Selected Answer:FalseQuestion 111 out of 1 pointsThe types of product defects that have traditionally been recognized in product liability law include manufacturing defects.Selected Answer:TrueQuestion 121 out of 1 pointsA manufacturing defect is a departure from a product unit's design specifications that results in products that are physically flawed.Selected Answer:TrueQuestion 131 out of 1 pointsTo successfully assert a design defect, a plaintiff has to show that no reasonable alternative design was available.Selected Answer:FalseQuestion 141 out of 1 pointsUnder a theory of market-share liability, a manufacturer sells "shares" of its potential strict liability and thereby spreads the risk and the cost.
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  • Fall '15
  • Product liability, Gallagher, Talia, Forest & Field

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