Lecture7_S08

Lecture7_S08 - Lecture 7 Last time we learned the rate of a...

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Lecture 7 Last time we learned the rate of a reaction is proportional to the concentration of reagents (today we modify to: raised to some power) Mathematically: rate law of a reaction Rate = k[reactant] x Rate constant (proportionality) If we find this we can predict the future Exponent = the order for this reactant, tells us how many molecules come together during rate limiting step or if the reactant interferes with reaction We find this from some experiments, NOT from stoichiometry Experiment 1: measure rate at some given [reactant] Experiment 2: double concentration, measure rate, and compare: Rate 2 = k(2*[reactant]) x k[reactant] x 2 x = Rate 1 k([reactant]) x k[reactant] x Rate 2 = 2 x Rate 1 If rate stays same after doubling [reactant] rate2/rate1 = 1 = 2 x , then x = 0 If rate doubles after doubling [reactant] rate2/rate1 = 2 = 2 x , then x = 1 If rate quadruples after doubling [reactant] rate2/rate1 = 4 = 2 x , then x = 2 If, instead, we triple the concentration in experiment 2:
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Lecture7_S08 - Lecture 7 Last time we learned the rate of a...

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