Lecture Outline 12, Shaping America in the Antebellum Age--Utopian Communitarianism and Social Ref

Lecture Outline 12, Shaping America in the Antebellum Age--Utopian Communitarianism and Social Ref

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Lecture 12, Shaping America in the Antebellum Age-- Utopian Communitarianism and Social Reform 1. Introduction a. Responses to change: i Utopian communitarianism ii Social Reform b. Individualism 2. Perfectionist Reform and Utopianism a. Reasons for reform: i Second Great Awakening ii Secular influences b. The Dilemmas of Reform i. Reformers disagreed about how to accomplish their goals. ii. Should reform occur from the top-down, or bottom-up? Bottom-up: Focused on the individual Top-down: Focused on institutions c. Utopian Communities i. Religious Utopias: Oneida Shakers Millerites Mormons ii. Secular Utopias New Harmony Brook Farm iii. Failure of utopian communities Americans too individualistic rming Society: a. Single-issue reforms: i. Temperance American Temperance Society Saw alcohol abuse as a moral failure Washington Temperance Society Saw alcohol abuse as a disease ii. Health iii. Sexuality b. Institutional Reforms: i. Asylums Dorothea Dix ii. Orphanages Charles Loring Brace
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Unformatted text preview: Childrens Aid Society iii. Working-Class Reform Workingmens parties Trade Unions National Trades Union, 1834 4. Abolitionism and Women's Rights: a. Tensions within the Anti-slavery Movement i. Immediatists American Anti-Slavery Society William Lloyd Garrison, The Liberator ii. Gradualists: American Colonization Society iii. Abolitionist movement split along ideological lines b. Flood Tide of Abolitionism i. Abolitionists were subjected to attacks ii. Gag rule: prevented discussion of abolition in Congress c. Women's Rights i. Grew out of middle-class womens fight for abolition ii. Reform offered women a chance to challenge the cult of domesticity iii. Seneca Falls, New York 1848 Lucretia Mott Elizabeth Cady Stanton Declaration of Sentiments All men and women are created equal Called for 11 resolutions to be met, incl. Right to vote Women dont get the vote until 1920 5. Conclusion...
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Lecture Outline 12, Shaping America in the Antebellum Age--Utopian Communitarianism and Social Ref

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