05 Catalase and O2 TN - Activity 5 Teacher Notes Catalase...

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Activity 5 Teacher Notes – Catalase Enzyme Activity PS-2820 Teacher Notes – Activity 5: Catalase Enzyme Activity Time Estimates Preparation: 30 min Activity: 50 min Objectives Students will be able to… measure the concentration of gaseous oxygen in a container with a mixture of dilute hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and catalase extract under a variety of conditions (e.g., change in pH, change in temperature) compare the production of gaseous oxygen for each trial calculate the rate of catalase enzyme activity for each trial state how the catalase enzyme activity is affected by the various changes in conditions Notes Sensor calibration is good laboratory practice. However, this activity deals only with relative changes in measurements. It is not necessary to calibrate the CO 2 Gas Sensor Sensor. The materials in this lab present no serious safety hazards. The peroxide mixtures can be flushed down the drain with a large quantity of water. Run the water for around a minute. For information about the safe handling and disposal of chemicals, refer to the Flinn Scientific catalog. Contact Flinn Scientific at (800) 452-1261. As a pre-lab activity or demonstration, allow students to add hydrogen peroxide to a variety of organisms or tissues and see the bubbles of oxygen that are formed. Suggested tissue materials include slices of vegetables such as potatoes, turnips, or other starch- bearing vegetables; sliced fruits (e.g., apples, pears, and bananas); and cultures of organisms (e.g., yeast). Slices of animal liver produce a large reaction and an abundance of oxygen. Slice or puree the material (about 25 cm 3 ) and place in a small beaker. Add a small amount (about 25 mL) of undiluted 3% H 2 O 2 to the beaker and the material will begin to foam up. Ask the students what the foam is and allow them the opportunity to design a simple experiment to determine what the evolved gas might be. Students can demonstrate that the gas evolved is oxygen by placing a glowing wooden splint into a large bubble or a blob of such bubbles. In the presence of oxygen, the glowing tip of the splint will flash a bright light or burst into flames. Compare the effect the glowing wooden splint has on the CO 2 bubbles produced by mixing vinegar and baking soda, for instance. Follow up the inquiry activity or demonstration with a discussion of the importance of catalase and then have the students work through the lab. Chicken livers are readily available and inexpensive. A single, one–pint package (less than 1 lb or about 0.5 kg) can supply an entire class with all the liver they need. You can freeze unused livers for about a year before the enzymatic activity of the catalase begins to Biology with Xplorer GLX Teacher Notes © 2005 PASCO p. 153
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Activity 5 Teacher Notes – Catalase Enzyme Activity PS-2820 decline. Beef livers and pork livers also have high levels of catalase and make good
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