Hist test - 10 Plan In the wake of the Civil War tension existed between the president and Congress when it came time to set forth a reconstruction

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10% Plan – In the wake of the Civil War, tension existed between the president and Congress when it came time to set forth a reconstruction policy. President Lincoln proposed the Ten Percent Plan as a way of setting up new loyal governments. The plan stated that citizens of a state could set up a government once ten percent or more of the population had taken an oath of allegiance to the Union and acknowledged the legality of emancipation. Lincoln proposed this policy for two reasons: he hoped to weaken the southern cause by allowing half-convinced Confederates to easily switch sides, and he also hoped to further his policy of emancipation. 14 th Amendment – In 1866, the feud between President Johnson and Congress became irreconcilable. Because the Republican majority in Congress feared that President Johnson would not enforce civil rights legislation, the Fourteenth Amendment was passed. This amendment held the federal government responsible for guaranteeing equal rights to all Americans. It extended national citizenship to “all persons born or naturalized in the United States.” Other sections were more applicable in the context of time period, such as protecting black men’s voting rights, denying office to those who had supported the Confederacy, and repudiating the Confederate debt. It was understood that Southerners needed to ratify it in order for their states to be readmitted. Carpetbaggers – A nickname given to the northern businessmen traveling to the south, carpetbaggers were one of three groups who comprised the southern Republican party that gained strength in 1867. These businessmen were interested in enlisting government aid for private enterprise. From state to state, various groups formed a short-lived coalition (lasting only 1-9 years depending on the state). Despite their short life, these southern Republicans did make some substantial achievements, such as a plan for the South’s first systems of public education, democratized local and state governments, and appropriated funds for the expansion of public services and responsibilities. Compromise of 1877 – In 1876, Rutherford Hayes, Republican, was pitted against Samuel Tilden, Democrat, in a very close election. When three southern states’ votes were contested, Republican strategists realized that the election could go either way. To end the stalemate, Congress appointed fifteen members to determine which candidate would receive the disputed votes. This commission was originally evenly split – seven Republicans, seven Democrats, and one independent. When the independent resigned in order to run for the Senate and a Republican took his place, the commission was then split among party lines and the Republicans won eight to seven. This decision, however, still had to be ratified by Congress. In order to avoid a filibuster in the Democrat- controlled House, Republican leaders secretly talked with conservative Southern
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course HIST 176 taught by Professor Guise-richardson during the Fall '07 term at Missouri S&T.

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Hist test - 10 Plan In the wake of the Civil War tension existed between the president and Congress when it came time to set forth a reconstruction

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