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University of Southern California Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering ISE 310L Production I; Facilities and Logistics Spring 2000 February Lecture Handouts (Part 2) General Flow Pattern Flow Distance Calculations Dr. Ardavan Asef-Vaziri
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General Flow Pattern After completing Product design Market Research Break-Even analysis Make / Buy decision Process design Schedule design Machine fraction calculations Now we have - Parts list of each product - Production routing of each part - Machine of each operation - Total material & parts inflow - Number of machines The next step in facilities planning process is to imagine the overall flow pattern in the factory. The general flow pattern is the back bone of the production system. Four well know general flow patterns are Straight line, U shaped, Zigzag, and Loop. However, no real world general flow pattern is so simple. There are many factors which do not allow the general flow pattern to remain so simple. Among these factors are # of parts, # of processes, # of machines, special requirements of machines and processes, # of assemblies and subassemblies, location of external infrastructure facilities, building restrictions, and material handling system characteristics. Examples of the simple back bones, and their augmented forms are shown on the next page.
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Signs of a good general flow pattern 1- A back bone for flow which emanate from receiving and terminate at shipping. 2- Well grouped flow lines with hierarchical densities which orderly join the main stream. 3- Straight lines, short lines of flow, which indicates that the relative activities are located close to each others. 4- Minimum back-tracking. 5- Material are moved directly to point of use, not first to an intermediate storage and then to the next activity. 6- Minimum WIP. 7- Flow pattern is easily expandable, new processes can easily be merged in.
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After the initial design of the general flow pattern, we should also design the arrangement of machines with respect to each others. We should also design the arrangement of machines with respect to aisles. Some example are shown on the next page, operators are shown by small circles, represent operators. Flow within product department (a) End-to-end (b) Back-to-end (c) Front-to-end (d)Circular (e) Odd-angle (a) (b) (c) Flow within process departments (a)Parallel (b)Perpendicular (c)Diagonal Graphical Tools for Analysis and design of material flow system We have already discussed: Assembly chart Operations process chart Some others are: Flow process chart Flow diagram Composite flow diagram From-To chart
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Flow Process chart is quite similar to Operations Process Chart, its format is similar, and it shows assemblies, operations, and inspections. However, it also shows material handling and storage. Flow Diagram is a flow process chart spread over the layout of the corresponding area.
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2009 for the course ISE 310L taught by Professor Bottlik during the Spring '06 term at USC.

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note3 - University of Southern California Department of...

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