GrammarFinal

GrammarFinal - Indefinite and Negative Words Spanish...

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Spanish Grammar Final Indefinite and Negative Words Positive (Sp.) Positive (English) Negative (Spanish) Negative (Eng.) Algo Something nada Nothing Alguien Somebody Nadie Nobody Siempre Always Nunca Never ¿jamás? (ever) ¡Jamás! (never) Alguno Someone Ninguno No one Los dos Both Ninguno (de los dos) None o…o Either. .or Ni…ni Neither…nor Word Order You will recall that when making a statement with a negative word before the verb, Spanish follows that same pattern as English. Nada está en la mesa. = Nothing is on the table. When making a statement with a negative word after the verb, however, Spanish does not follow the same pattern as English. In addition to the negative word after the verb, Spanish inserts no directly before the verb, thus producing a double negative. Yo no escribo nada . = I write nothing. Some/None In Spanish I you were introduced to the Spanish equivalents of some and none: some= algunos/as, none = ninguno/a As indefinite pronouns, some and none reflect the gender and number of the noun they represent. As indefinite adjectives before a noun, alguo and ninguno drop their final o and add an accent: algún and ningún. As a memory aid, it is helpful to think of alguno and ninguno as alg- and ning- before the indefinite article: Alg- un(o), una, unos, unas ; Ning- un(o), una, unos, unas Meanings and Uses Whether standing along or used before a noun, alguno(s) (some) and ninguno (none) always refer to some (or none) of a specific group of items or people: they are selective: Algunos de los chocolates. = Some of the chocolates. ; Algunas amigas. = Some friends. ; Ninguno de los chocolates.= None of the chocolates. ; Ninguna amiga. No friend. As word referring to some (or none) of a particular group, alguno(s) and ninguno should not be confused with their more general counterparts algo (something) , alguien (somebody) , nada (nothing) , nadie (nobody) . TH elatter do not refer to some (or none) of a particular group, but are blanket generalizations. They are not selective. Compare: ¿Quiere Ud. algo? = Do you want something? (in general) vs. ¿Quiere Ud.algunos? = Do you want some? (i.e. chocolates) ; Yo no quiero nada. (in general) = I don’t want anything. Vs. Yo no quiero ninguno. = I don’t want any (i.e. chocolates) Both/ Neither In Spanish I you were introduction to the Spanish evivalents of both and neither: both = los dos (ambos) ; neither: ninguno (de los dos) . As pronouns standing alone or as adjectives before the noun, both and neither reflect gender of the noun they represent. Los dos (ambos) libros = both books ; ninguna de las clases = neither of the classes Either…or/ Neither…nor Either…or and neither…nor are rendered in Spanish by o…o and ni…ni respectively: o Juan o María = either John or Mary ; ni Juan ni María = neither John nor Mary Summary It is important to remember that whenever any on of the above negative words appears before they verb, Spanish follows the same word order as English: Ninguno está aquí. = None (neither) is here. Whenever any one of he above negative words
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course SP 103 taught by Professor Klabbermatten during the Fall '07 term at Gustavus.

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GrammarFinal - Indefinite and Negative Words Spanish...

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