Ch.13

Ch.13 - Voting Behavior Participation Turnout refers to the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Voting Behavior Participation Turnout refers to the proportion of the voting age public that actually votes. About 40% of the eligible adult population votes regularly, 25% are occasional voters, and 35% rarely or never vote. Income —people with higher incomes, have a higher tendency to vote. In part this is because income and education are correlated and people with more income tend to have more education. Plus wealthier citizens are more likely to think the system works for them and that their votes make a difference. Lower income citizens are often alienated from politics and are apathetic. Age —older people tend to vote more often. Less than half of eligible 18- 24 year olds are even registered to vote. Gender —women have had the vote since 1920. Since 1980, there has been talk of a gender gap. This means that women have a higher tendency to vote for Democrats than Republicans. The size varies election to election but is usually around 5-7%. Race —in general, whites tend to vote more regularly than African Americans, though this may be due to income and education not race. However, middle class and wealthy African Americans are also less likely to vote. In general, African Americans tend to vote Democratic though that is becoming less true of late. Hispanic Americans tend to vote Democratic except for those of Cuban heritage who vote Republican. Asian Americans have considerably more diversity in their voting choices. For example, Chinese Americans tend to vote Democratic, but
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Ch.13 - Voting Behavior Participation Turnout refers to the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online