Ch.23

Ch.23 - Ch.23 Sharecropping and Tenant Farming Who Former...

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Ch.23 Sharecropping and Tenant Farming Who: Former Black Slaves Where: Southern Plantations What: Unable to find work as free men, blacks were forced to go back to work for their former masters. Using the "crop-lien" system, storekeepers extended credit to farmers for food and supplies, in exchange for a part of their harvest. Sig. After the Civil War, former slaves found that their living conditions were hardly better now that they were free men. Source: AP 510 Civil Rights 1875, 1883 Who: Congress, Supreme Court What: During Reconstruction, the Civil Rights Act of 1875 tried to grant equal accommodations in public places and prohibit racial discrimination in jury selection. In the Civil Rights Cases in 1883, the Supreme Court declared most of the Civil Rights Act unconstitutional. It even said that the Fourteenth Amendment prohibited only government violations of civil rights, not individual violations. (“No state shall . . . .) Sig: The Civil Rights Act was a large step toward total equality of blacks. However, the Civil Rights Cases took a step backwards. It showed the still lingering effects of slavery and white supremacy that would last for close to another century. Source:
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course ? ? taught by Professor ? during the Spring '07 term at Gustavus.

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Ch.23 - Ch.23 Sharecropping and Tenant Farming Who Former...

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