Ch.14

Ch.14 - -National Road / Cumberland Road (1811-1852) Who:...

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-National Road / Cumberland Road (1811-1852) Who: United States Where: Cumberland, Maryland to Vandalia, Illinois What: A government highway constructed from 1811-1852. The highway stretched from Cumberland, Maryland to Vandalia, Illinois--591 miles. Due to the War of 1812, construction was delayed. With help from the states and federal government, it was completed in 1852. Sig: This road allowed faster commerce, and the creation of a National Market. Source: AP310 -Erie Canal (1817-1825) Who: New York Where: Linked the Great Lakes with the Hudson River. What: The Erie Canal was a “boom” for internal improvements. Construction on the Canal began in 1817, and the Canal was completed in 1825. It came to be 363 miles long. This canal was dug up by “resourceful New Yorkers” who were cut off by federal aid by states righters. Sig: This allowed the nation to begin moving westward, and tied the West and East, together. The canal also made shipping cheaper, and as a result, the cities along the canal, boomed. This also helped the beginnings of a National Market. Source: AP312 -American (Know-Nothing) Party 1840s-1850s Who: Strong Anti-foreigners or “nativists” What: A political platform aiming for rigid restrictions on immigration and naturalization and laws authorizing the deportation of alien paupers. Sig.: This promoted a strong hatred toward Irish and German Catholics that carried through into the 1900s. Source: www.ulib.iupui.edu , AP296 SECTIONALISM AND ECONOMIC DIFFERENCES AMONG THE SECTIONS Eli Whitney and the Cotton Gin (1793) Who: Eli Whitney Where: The South What: Eli Whitney was born and raised in Massachusetts, and after graduating from Yale, he traveled south towards Georgia, to serve as a private tutor while preparing for law. Hearing that the South’s poverty could be relieved if someone could invent a workable device for separating the seed form the short-staple cotton fiber, Eli Whitney accomplished that feat within 10 days. The machine proved to be 50
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course ? ? taught by Professor ? during the Spring '07 term at Gustavus.

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Ch.14 - -National Road / Cumberland Road (1811-1852) Who:...

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