Landersonmalm_Week09AmericanReligiousHistoryInterviewElizabeth_120615

Landersonmalm_Week09AmericanReligiousHistoryInterviewElizabeth_120615

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

Running head: WEEK 09 – INTERVIEW - ELIZABETH 1 Week 09 – Interview with Elizabeth Lori L. Anderson-Malm Rasmussen College Author Note This paper is being submitted on December 6, 2015 for Mary Thon’s American Religious History course.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

WEEK 09 – INTERVIEW - ELIZABETH 2 Week 09 – Interview with Elizabeth There has been an opportunity to travel back in time to have a conversation with Elizabeth who is a Fundamentalist living in the 1930’s. After speaking with Elizabeth we will gain a better understanding of fundamentalism at the time in America. This time in American history is exciting and ever changing and I am looking forward to learning from Elizabeth. Question 1: What did it mean to be a Fundamentalist in the 1930’s and how did America understand Fundamentalism at this time? Elizabeth: I need to go a bit further back in American history in order to answer that question. We as Fundamentalists started to feel a bit displaced because of the large amount of non- Protestant immigrants that came to America in the early 1900’s (Wacker, 2000). We did not agree with the teaching of evolution in public schools, which we paid for with our taxes, and we resented the elitism of educators who seemed to scorn the values of traditional Christian families (Wacker, 2000). As for how America understood Fundamentalism at that time, I think some people thought we were a bit excessive. Even with that sentiment we were able to grow and flourish and in the 1930’s Fundamentalism moved underground, so to speak, where we continued to build a network of day schools, college’s seminaries and missionary agencies (Wacker, 2000).
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern