A&P Chapter 12 - Chapter 12 Nervous Tissue Lecture...

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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 1 Chapter 12 Nervous Tissue Lecture Outline Dr. Navin Maswood
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 2 Nervous Tissue Controls and integrates all body activities within limits that maintain life Three basic functions: sensing changes with sensory receptors fullness of stomach or sun on your face Sensory (afferent) neurons serve this function. The integrative function is to analyze the sensory information, store some aspects, and make decisions regarding appropriate behaviors. Association or interneurons serve this function. reacting to those changes with effectors muscular contractions glandular secretions Motor (efferent) neurons serve this function. The branch of medical science that deals with the normal functioning and disorders of the nervous system is called neurology .
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 3 Major Structures of the Nervous System Central nervous system (CNS) consists of the brain and spinal cord Peripheral nervous system (PNS) consists of cranial and spinal nerves that contain both sensory and motor fibers connects CNS to muscles, glands & all sensory receptors
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 4 Organization of the Nervous System CNS is brain and spinal cord Ganglia, located outside the brain and spinal cord, are small masses of nervous tissue, containing primarily cell bodies of neurons Enteric plexuses help regulate the digestive system. Sensory receptors are either parts of neurons or specialized cells that monitor changes in the internal or external environment.
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 5 Subdivisions of the PNS Somatic (voluntary) nervous system (SNS) neurons from cutaneous and special sensory receptors to the CNS motor neurons to skeletal muscle tissue Autonomic (involuntary) nervous systems sensory neurons from visceral organs to CNS muscle and glands sympathetic division (speeds up heart rate) parasympathetic division (slow down heart rate) Enteric nervous system (ENS) neurons function independently of ANS & CNS
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6 Neurons Functional unit of nervous system Have capacity to produce action potentials electrical excitability Cell body single nucleus with prominent nucleolus Nissl bodies (chromatophilic substance) neurofilaments give cell shape and support microtubules move material inside cell The dendrites are the receiving or input portions of a neuron. The
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course ZOOL 2013 taught by Professor Maswood during the Spring '08 term at Texas Woman's University.

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A&P Chapter 12 - Chapter 12 Nervous Tissue Lecture...

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