A&P Chapter 16 - Chapter 16 Sensory, Motor &...

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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 1 Chapter 16 Lecture Outline Dr. Navin Maswood
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 2 INTRODUCTION The components of the brain interact to receive sensory input, integrate and store the information, and transmit motor responses. To accomplish the primary functions of the nervous system there are neural pathways to transmit impulses from receptors to the circuitry of the brain, which manipulates the circuitry to form directives that are transmitted via neural pathways to effectors as a response.
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 3 Sensory Modalities Sensory Modality is the property by which one sensation is distinguished from another. Two classes of sensory modalities general senses include both somatic and visceral senses, which provide information about conditions within internal organs. special senses include the modalities of smell, taste, vision, hearing, and equilibrium.
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 4 Process of Sensation Sensory receptors demonstrate selectivity respond to only one type of stimuli Components of a sensation: (stimulation, transduction, A) a stimulus or change in the environment, capable of initiating a nerve impulse by the nervous system must be present. B) a sensory receptors must pick up the stimulus & transduce (convert) into a nerve impulse by way of a generator potential C) The impulse must be conducted along a neural pathway from the receptor or the sense organ to the brain D) A region of the brain or spinal cord must translate the impulse into a sensation .
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 5 Structural Classification of Receptors Free nerve endings (ex cold sensitive receptors) bare dendrites Encapsulated nerve endings ( Pressure sensitive receptor) dendrites enclosed in connective tissue capsule Separate sensory receptor cell ( Ex. Taste receptor) specialized cells that respond to stimuli vision, taste, hearing, balance
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 6 Structural Classification Compare free nerve ending, encapsulated nerve ending and sensory receptor cell
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 7 Classification by Location Exteroceptors near surface of body receive external stimuli hearing, vision, smell, taste, touch, pressure, pain, Interoceptors monitors internal environment (BV or viscera) not conscious except for pain or pressure Proprioceptors senses body position & movement
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Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology, 11e 8 Classification by Stimuli Detected Mechanoreceptors detect pressure or stretch touch, pressure, vibration, hearing, proprioception,
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course ZOOL 2013 taught by Professor Maswood during the Spring '08 term at Texas Woman's University.

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A&P Chapter 16 - Chapter 16 Sensory, Motor &...

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