Endocrine System

Endocrine System - Endocrine System Endocrine Glands...

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Endocrine System
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Endocrine Glands Endocrine Glands release hormones (chemical signals) to allow cells to communicate with other cells at a distance Hormones circulate to all tissues but only activate cells referred to as target cells To reach their target cells the hormones travel through the bloodstream, lymph vessels, or interstitial fluid Target cells must have specific receptors to which the hormone binds These receptors may be intracellular or located on the plasma membrane
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Endocrine Glands/Organs Pineal Gland-Located in Brain Pituitary Gland (Hypophysis) Thyroid Gland Parathyroid Gland Thymus Pancreas Adrenal Gland
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Endocrine Glands/Organs Ovary Testes Kidney Heart
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Major Endocrine Organs Figure 16.1
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Triggers for Hormone Release Humoral Signals: concentration of chemicals within the blood or other fluid (ex: Calcium concentrations in the blood) Neural Signals: Neuron activation releases the hormone from a gland Hormonal Signals: The presence of a hormone signals the release of other hormones
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Major Endocrine Glands
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Pineal Gland Part of the Diencephalon in the brain Secretes the hormone Melatonin
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Pituitary (Hypophysis) Extends from the ventral part of the brain Consists of two components: Adenohypophysis or anterior lobe Releasing Factors from the hypothalamus trigger the release of hormones from the adenohypophysis Releasing Factors are specific for the hormone(s) they release Neurohypophysis which is comprised of the posterior lobe and the infundibulum Neurons in the hypothalamus produce and secrete the hormone The neuron axon terminals are located next to blood vessels in the neurohypophysis where they secrete the hormone
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Figure 16.5 Pituitary (Hypophysis)
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Hormones of the Pituitary Neurohypophysis: Oxytocin Vasopressin (Antidiuretic hormone) Adenohypophysis: Growth Hormone Prolactin Adrenocorticotropin Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Follicle Stimulating Hormone Luteinizing Hormone
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Thyroid Gland Located near the Larynx Cells in the thyroid: Follicular Cells produce Thyroglobulin which is then converted into Thyroid hormone
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course BIOL 310 taught by Professor Kay-nishiyama during the Fall '07 term at CSU Northridge.

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Endocrine System - Endocrine System Endocrine Glands...

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