February 20 - February 20 1pm Chapter 9 Table 9.1 joint...

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Unformatted text preview: February 20 1pm Chapter 9 Table 9.1 joint classification (dont need to know structural category or nomenclature) Joints/ Articulations 1. Fibrous a. Characteristics i. Dense regular connective tissue unites the ends of bones and bone parts ii. No joint cavity b. Example i. Teeth to jaw through collagen fibers (fibrous joint) ii. Lambdoid suture- Occipital to parietal bones iii. Articulation between: 1. radius and ulna 2. tibia and fibula 2. Cartilaginous a. Characteristics i. Pad of cartilage lines between ends of bone ii. No joint cavity iii. Somewhat movable b. Example i. Epiphyseal plates in growing bones ii. Costochondral joints iii. Pubic symphysis- between ossa coxae iv. Intervertebral disc articulations 3. Synovial a. Characteristics i. Filled with synovial fluid to 1. Act as a lubricant 2. Nourish articular cartilages chondrocytes 3. Shock absorber ii. In highly/freely movable joints iii. Ends of bone covered with articular cartilage (which gradually wears away from abuse, disease or injury- principal condition to difficulty in joints is arthritis (inflammation) 1. Reduces friction during movement iv. Joint cavity separates the articulating bones v. Enclosed by joint capsule b. Example i. Knees ii. Planar joint/ gliding 1. Ankles- intertarsal joints 2. Wrists- intercarpal joints iii. Hinge joint 1. Elbow- humeroulnar joint iv. Pivot joint 1. Atlantoaxial joint (rotation)- between 1 st 2 cervical vertebrae v. Condyloid joint 1. Fingers- MP (metacarpophalangeal joint)- move in 2 axes vi. Shoulders vii. Hips viii.Saddle joint 1. Articulation between carpal and 1 st metacarpal bone ix. Ball and socket joint 1. Glenohumeral joint 2. Coxal joint Fig 9.2 Fibrous joints Bones like tibia and fibula and lower arm are connected by collagen fibers and make a joint; move slightly relative to each other with how you move your leg and which muscles you contract Principle condition that makes hard to move joints 1. Inflammation of joints 2. b/c not making enough synovial fluid 3. or cartilage is worn away over the years 4. meniscus in femur become thinner and thinner, so articular cartilage on each tibia and fibula rub against each other 5. infection in knee; more common is auto-immune disease where your immune system is attacking its own body rather than defending it Clinical view 1. Rheumatoid arthritis- misshapes joints 2. Osteoarthritis- as you get older, typical wearing away of cartilage in elderly 3. Gouty arthritis- from producing too much uric acid which effects the synovial lining of joints and produces gout Ankles and other joints Fig 9.15 Bursitis- inflammation of bursa, which is a bag of synovial fluid that serves as a cushion between a bone and ligament o If bursitis, pain would be in a certain plane because using a certain muscle o If pain in joint, pain in plane would be any plane joint moves o Synovial fluid comes from the blood o Around major movable joints Similar is tendon sheath which is like a covering around a tendon to protect tendon from...
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course ANAT BS 212 taught by Professor Zink during the Spring '08 term at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.

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February 20 - February 20 1pm Chapter 9 Table 9.1 joint...

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