CHEM150-001April8 DNotes

CHEM150-001April8 DNotes - Wine & Cheese CHEESE...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
14:52 CHEESE Thomas Muffet was a 16 th  century British physician who loved spiders and kept them to beautify  rooms with their webs. His daughter Patience (aka little Miss Muffet) did not share his love! “Curds and whey” is the essence of the whole cheese making process curds   hard substance that separates when you curdle milk whey   liquid substance that separates out  There are many variety of cheeses at different price points What makes a cheese a “good cheese?” Cheese has infiltrated our language: “cheesed off,” “say cheese,” “cut the cheese”  9000 BC “Pot Cheese” someone noticed milk had gone sour and changed in appearance (liquids and solids were  separated) someone tasted the solid part and realized it was good   thus born cheese o acid producing bacterium had gotten into the cheese o acid caused the proteins in the milk to separate out and curdle, producing cheese 2300 BC nomad in dessert was carrying milk in a bag (made from the stomach of a calf)  inside of the stomach, the milk had solidified  enzyme present in the stomach’s linings that caused the proteins to separate out from the  whey 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
thus born Renate cheese Ancient Romans made wide variety of cheeses ex. Provalone  Cheese can have many different tastes depending on the process and bacteria culture used Most of milk used comes from cows  Doesn’t have to be cow’s milk – it can be from any animal Ex. camel milk, goat milk Goat cheese contains caproic acid which gives it a distinct scent o Caproic acid is not pleasant in very concentrated form Milk     87% water 5% lactose 3.5% fat (mostly saturated, which is not ideal for cholesterol) 3.5% protein 1% minerals (esp. calcium)  o probably the biggest source of Ca in our diet Milk protein: Protein is curled up into micelles  3 different kinds of proteins in milk (all are casein micelles) depends on different amino acid composition and lengths caseins are long molecules curled up into a ball
Background image of page 2
o alpha casein o beta casein o kappa casein the elastic that holds the protein “ball” together micelles have roughly the same density of water (suspended in the milk)  for the protein to separate out (curdle), kappa casein must be cut which allows the other  proteins to unravel o uncoil, bound to each other, becoming water insoluble, precipitate out (carrying some milk  fat) simplest way to break kappa casein is by the addition of acid o ex. add vinegar to milk and whey will separate from curds Process     To make a simple cheese, start with an acid-producing bacteria culture 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 33

CHEM150-001April8 DNotes - Wine & Cheese CHEESE...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online