Stress vs Strain Lab Report - Hanna Richardson The Tensile...

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Hanna Richardson The Tensile Test Hanna Richardson
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Hanna Richardson Abstract In this lab experiment five aluminum alloy samples were tested in order to determine their mechanical properties of each sample. This lab is used to attempt to gain a better understanding of a stress-strain curve. This experiment is important because it is crucial to know the physical properties of the material that engineers wish to use. The stress-strain curves help with studying the mechanical behaviors of the metals. Introduction A tensile test is one of the most fundamental type of mechanical tests one can perform on a material. Tensile tests are common because they are relatively inexpensive, simple, and fully standardized. As tension is applied to a material, you will quickly determine how that material reacts when forces are applied to it. A load-versus-elongation curve is the immediate result of a tensile test, and it is formed when a load necessary to produce a given elongation is monitored as the specimen is pulled in tension at a constant rate. The resulting stress-versus-strain curve is a more general name for the curve that is produced. The engineering stress, σ, is defined as σ = P A 0 where P is the load on the sample with original cross-sectional area, A 0 . The sample cross-sectional area refers to the region near the center of the materials length.
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Hanna Richardson Gage length is the smallest area region. The gage length experiences the largest stress concentration so that any significant deformation at higher stresses is localized there. The engineering strain, ε, is defined as ε = I I 0 I 0 = Δ I I 0 where I is the gage length at the given load and I 0 is the original length. The curve is then divided into two regions known as the elastic deformation region and plastic deformation region. The elastic region of the curve is the initial linear portion where there is temporary deformation. The plastic
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  • Fall '09
  • Staff
  • Alloy, Tensile strength, Hanna Richardson, aluminum alloy sample

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