$RULHSEH - Microstructures In A Metal Miranda Burns CHE 295...

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Microstructures In A Metal Miranda Burns CHE 295, Dr. Kaukler September 23, 2014
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Abstract The purpose of the experiment was to determine the properties of a material and how they are directly associated to the microstructure of the material. Grain size analysis can be used as an efficient way to predict the physical properties and the possible history of a material. In this laboratory experiment, we examined microstructures of steel nails. The nail was heated in a furnace for a length of time to mold into a 1 ¼” black bakelight pre-mold. We reached flat, scratch-free, and mirror like surfaces through the process of rough grinding, fine grinding, polishing, and etching. We examined the sample results under the microscope to determine the grain size. Introduction Microstructures are defined as regions of different atomic or molecular ordering than the surroundings. It is the structure that is observed when a polished and etched example of metal is viewed in an optical microscope at magnification ranges between x25 to x1500. Microstructures have the ability to play an important part in determining a material’s mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties. Knowing what microstructures exist in a given material is an important part of revealing the nature of a material to its specific properties. Upon discovering the material’s microstructure, one can relate it to the properties of the materials. Microscopy is the visual study of objects of extremely small sizes while; microstructures generally have many variations that are typically viewed through the microscope. There are many types of microscopes that are used for different purposes in this experiment. Optical scanning electron (SEM), transmission electron (TEM), scanning probe (SPM), and scanning tunneling (STM) are all different types of microscopes that have different sizing ranges, that use different methods of
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imaging i.e. light, electrons, and atomic size needles. Microscopes are of great importance in the study of material science. Preparation of a sample of material to examine its microstructure is an extremely important part for analyzing the structure accurately. He surface of the material must be highly polished and extremely clean in order to clearly view the microstructure. The purpose of this experiment was to study the microstructures of the given metal. Many materials can be prepared for analysis of microstructures, but metals are generally the easiest to prepare for analysis.
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