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History of the HolocaustUnit 1: The Rise of Anit-SemitismThe Holocaust, the state-sponsored, intentional, and systemic extermination of the Jewish people of Europe,has its roots in earlier traditions of anti-Semitism. From the early Christian church to the anti-Semitism of socialDarwinism in the late 19th century, the widespread prejudice against the Jews enabled Adolf Hitler and theNazi party to enact broad-ranging legislation against Jews and other non-Aryan peoples in Germany. Afterseveral years of progressive legal restrictions, the Nazi party began to sanction more violent means ofeliminating the Jews and implemented forced emigration policies. Eventually, discrimination and plannedexpulsion led to the extermination camps and Hitler’s final solution, the Holocaust.After studying this unit, you will be able to:1.Understand the history of anti-Semitism in the Christian West.2.Recognize the role anti-Semitism played in the rise of the Nazi party.3.Use a timeline to develop a sequence of events in Nazi Germany.4.Learn how these events, including restrictive laws and Kristallnacht, contributed to the Holocaust.5.Consider the role of the general population in allowing or objecting to anti-Semitism.Unit 2: Preparing for the “Final Solution”: The Ghettos and the Invasion of the Soviet UnionBetween 1939 and 1941, the Nazi party gained control of a large portion of Eastern Europe. German militaryforces, the SS, and compliant local authorities implemented a variety of provisional solutions to deal withunwanted populations in these regions, particularly Jews, the aim of which was the eventual elimination ofJews from Europe, particularly Western Europe. In Poland, ghettos confined, controlled, and decimated theJewish population, while in Lithuania and the Soviet Union, killing squads exterminated entire populations insome regions. The infrastructure, including transit and holding centers created between 1939 and 1941, helpedto support the eventual creation and implementation of large-scale extermination camps.After studying this unit, you will be able to:1.Describe the geographical progression of the Holocaust into Eastern Europe.2.Discuss the function of the Jewish ghetto for the Nazi party.3.Discuss the suffering within the ghetto and the Jewish response.4.Analyze the Einsatzgruppen and their role in the mass killing of the Jews.5.Discuss local responses to Nazi actions, from heroic resistance to cooperation.Unit 3: Arbeit Macht Frei: Confinement in the CampsThe concentration camp system, originally designed to confine political prisoners, provided the basis for boththe forced labor needed to maintain the Third Reich and the infrastructure required for the eventual annihilationof the Jewish people. The evolution of the concentration camps reflects the changing structure and priorities ofthe Nazi party between 1933 and the end of World War II in 1945. While the Nazi concentration camps werenot specifically intended to kill prisoners, starvation, cold, disease, and overwork killed unknown numberswithin the concentration camps throughout Europe.

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