alcohol fact sheet

Alcohol fact sheet - There are many strategies that people can use to stay safe when partying including 1 knowing how much alcohol someone has put

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
There are many strategies that people can use to stay safe when partying including: 1) knowing how much alcohol someone has put in their mixed drink, 2) never leaving their drink unattended, and 3) alternating their drinks with non-alcoholic drinks. If you’re under 21, it is illegal for an underage person to drive with any measurable amount of alcohol in their blood. While it is technically legal for a person to drive in this range (under 0.08) if over 21, don’t confuse what’s legal with what’s safe. It’s very important to realize that a person's ability to drive a car safely is impaired by alcohol, even at these lower levels of BAC. Roughly 2 out of every 3 students reported having their sleep or studying disrupted by others who were drinking. z For most people, it usually only takes a drink or two before alcohol starts interfering with their ability to learn new information. While the impairments produced at relatively low BAC levels are generally subtle, they do occur and could have a negative impact on someone’s academic performance. Learning is also strongly influenced by what is going on in a person’s life at that time – two different people studying the same material will learn slightly different things because they bring different knowledge, feelings, and history to the learning experience. Lastly, even if you’re not drinking, your studying may have been disrupted from other people’s behavior when they’ve consumed alcohol. Teenagers with a long-term pattern of seriously heavy drinking exhibit cognitive impairments (evidence of trouble thinking, processing information, and solving problems) for at least three weeks after their last drink. In order to help a person keep track of one's blood alcohol concentration (BAC), one should know exactly what they are drinking, consider the size of the cup, and keep track of how much they have had to drink. Hangovers produce a long list of symptoms that add up to create a pretty uncomfortable condition. Symptoms vary somewhat from person to person but generally include nausea, fatigue, headache, extreme thirst, and sensitivity to light and loud sounds. One of the key contributors to the headache and thirst that are often part of a hangover is dehydration. By altering activity in a brain region called the hypothalamus, alcohol causes the body to get rid of more water than it should. Male students tend to drink more heavily and more frequently than female students, and white students tend to drink more heavily than students of other races and ethnicities. Students in the Northeast are more likely to be high-risk drinkers than their peers in the Southwest. A standard drink is a specific amount of beer, wine, or liquor that contains the same total amount of alcohol. It is defined as a 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler (about 5% alcohol); an 8.5-ounce malt beverage (7% alcohol); a 5-ounce glass of wine (12% alcohol); or 1.5 ounces of liquor (about 40% alcohol – 80 proof) – whether that is in a mixed drink or as a shot. When the BAC gets in the range of 0.10-0.15, people often become emotional at these levels.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course HEALTH 111 taught by Professor Boon during the Spring '08 term at Pittsburgh.

Page1 / 6

Alcohol fact sheet - There are many strategies that people can use to stay safe when partying including 1 knowing how much alcohol someone has put

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online