Locke v Rousseau

Locke v Rousseau - Morgan Curtis History 101.07 February 8,...

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Morgan Curtis History 101.07 February 8, 2008 Alea Henle John Locke and Jean Rousseau both had very progressive ideas on sovereignty and government. In order to achieve a representative government and sovereignty, many steps need to occur for the government in place to be successful. Both authors argue that the members of a community need to give up some personal rights to the government in return for protection and unity. If a sovereign power was put in place without the members of the society putting some of them selves into the ruling power, this power will fail. A government or ruling force gains its power from the people it commands. John Locke argues that there are crucial steps for a commonwealth to be successful. It has been stated that if men were to unite under a government, in return there must be some preservation of their own personal property. The government in turn must also enforce an “established and agreed upon” (Locke, pg. 15). The sovereign power does not have the ability to pass or enforce laws in which the public does not agree. The laws are in the basic and best interest of the members of the community. In addition to Locke’s ideas, Rousseau also makes similar statements on what constitutes
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Locke v Rousseau - Morgan Curtis History 101.07 February 8,...

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