Plato - Plato's belief of knowledge was rationalistic. In...

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Plato’s belief of knowledge was rationalistic. In the Meno, Socrates argues that we have full knowledge and it is obtained through recollection. Meno wants to know if virtue is taught or learned by practice. Meno raises the question of how do you know when you have the answer to a question? Will it be you don’t know the answer so you won’t recognize it when you find it or can it be that you already know the answer? There are three stages of questioning that Socrates uses to prove his point that we all have a priori knowledge. He uses of Meno’s uneducated slave boys to answer the questions. The stages he discusses can easily be refuted and fail to show any real truth in his point. Recollection is the things a person already knows but has forgotten. Through dialect, one can get at truth. The dialect must be a discussion with a sophist, one that is only concerned with the truth and has no other means. Only after the dialect can the ‘Stages of Recollection’ be reached. The first stage is asking questions. In the Meno , Socrates asks a boy to first identify a square. He goes on to ask more and more questions regarding the squares size by doubling it and
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This essay was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course PHIL 101 taught by Professor Kevin during the Fall '07 term at SUNY Albany.

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Plato - Plato's belief of knowledge was rationalistic. In...

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