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presentation - the choice to take the stairs or use the...

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Results Our first main effect, is the effect of observation type on the choice to take the stairs or escalator. The results are not significant, P = .501, however there is a trend here. In general, more subjects took the stairs when being overtly observed. About 41% of subjects took the stairs when being covertly observed, and about 46% of subjects took the stairs when being overtly observed. Here is our second predicted main effect, the effect of gender on the choice to take the stairs or escalator. Once again the results are not significant, P = .942. There is no evidence of a trend here. Overall, males and female took the stairs about the same amount. This is a table of the interaction effect between gender and observation type on
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Unformatted text preview: the choice to take the stairs or use the escalator. Though also not significant, there is a trend. The interaction effect was what researchers predicted. Among males, overt observation increased stair usage (from about 53% to 55%), while among females, overt observation decreased stair usage (from about 47% to 45%). Conclusion People are more likely to participate in non-organized exercise when being overtly observed. Males are more likely to participate in non-organized exercise when being overtly observed. Females are less likely to participate in non-organized exercise when being overtly observed. Internal/external validity...
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course PSYCH 32 taught by Professor Urry during the Summer '08 term at Tufts.

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