Introductory Paragraph

Introductory Paragraph - Introductory Paragraph “Obey the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Introductory Paragraph: “Obey the King” argued by Locke and Al Farabi POLS230 - Professor Moore Florian Mettetal 1/26/2009 Locke and Al Farabi disagree on why you should obey the king; Locke believes you should follow the King because you have consented to be a part of this King’s city while Al Farabi believes the King is perfect and knows better than anyone else and this is why you should obey him. Locke’s argument is that by consenting to the King’s rule you have traded your personal power to execute justice to your sovereign government in exchange for the preservation of your property. You have made this contract out of necessity because you cannot preserve your property from the beast without the protective cloak provided by a government. Therefore it is in your best interest to obey the King because the King protects your property. Al Farabi’s argument is based on his belief that you should trust the King because the King is perfect. Al Farabi explains that everything that exists has a varying portion of perfection, or the King is perfect....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/03/2009 for the course POLS 230 taught by Professor Moore during the Winter '09 term at Cal Poly.

Page1 / 2

Introductory Paragraph - Introductory Paragraph “Obey the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online