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Nisei Daughter - Nisei Daughter by Monica Sone tells the...

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Nisei Daughter by Monica Sone tells the true autobiographic tale of growing up as a young Japanese-American on Seattle’s waterfront during the 1930’s, the experience of being “relocated” during World War II, and her initial adjustment to life outside Camp Harmony. Monica (Kazuko) story is told from her personal perspective in a chronological narrative highlighting the high points of her life. Kazuko is initially shocked to find out she has Japanese blood in her, “one day when I was six-year-old, I made the shocking discovery that I had Japanese blood. I was Japanese” (3). Young Kazuko at this early stage in her life was not concerned with whether or not she was “plant or animal” (3). Kazuko up until this time has believed that she was a Yankee due to the fact that is what she hears the hotel guests call her. Kazuko is generally confused on her identity at such a young age it is not hard to understand her confusion and relate to a young individual who is trying to figure out where exactly she fits into this world. At the age of six her parents decide it is important for her to attend Nihon Gakko a Japanese school after grammar school every night. Kazuko was initially concerned by stating “So that’s what it meant to be a Japanese to lose my afternoon play hours! I fiercely resented this sudden intrusion of my blood into my affairs” (4). This lack of understanding is typical of a young child who does not fully grasp the ideas of culture or heritage.
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