{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

amistad reviews - AMISTAD FILM REVIEWS Joseph C Dorsey IDIS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
AMISTAD FILM REVIEWS
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Joseph C. Dorsey – IDIS 373, 491M – Spring 2008 1/30/2008
Background image of page 2
1. LA AMISTAD HOME   |   BIOLOGY   |  FILMS   |  GEOGRAPHY   |   HISTORY   |   INDEX   |   INVESTORS   |   MUSIC   |   SOLAR BOATS   |   SPORT La Amistad  ( Spanish : "Friendship") was a 19th-century two-masted  schooner  of about 120 tons' displacement. Built in the United States,  La  Amistad  was originally named  Friendship  but was renamed after being  purchased by a Spaniard.  La Amistad  became a symbol in the movement to  abolish slavery, after a group of  African  captives aboard revolted, and were  subsequently recaptured and sold into slavery, resulting in a legal battle over  their legal status. The incident In 1839, Africans being carried from Havana, Cuba, to Puerto Principe, Cuba,  revolted against their captors aboard  La Amistad . Their transport from Africa  to the  Americas  was illegal, and they were fraudulently described as having  been born in Cuba. After the revolt, the Africans demanded to be returned  home, but the ship’s navigator deceived them about their course, and sailed  them north along the North American coast to Long Island,  New York . The  schooner was subsequently taken into custody by the United States Navy;  and the Africans, who were deemed salvage from the vessel, were taken to  Connecticut to be sold as slaves. There ensued a widely publicized court  case about the ship and the legal status of the African captives. This incident  figured prominently in abolitionism in the United States.  See  "Amistad  (case)".
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
La Amistad - replica schooner sail boat Strictly speaking  La Amistad  was not a slave ship in the sense that she was  not designed to transport slaves, nor did she engage in the Middle Passage  of Africans to the Americas.  La Amistad  engaged in shorter, coastal trade.  The primary cargo carried by  La Amistad  was  sugar -industry products, and  her normal route ran from Havana to her home port, Guanaja. She also took  on passengers and, on occasion, slaves for transport. The captives that  La  Amistad  carried during the incident had been illegally transported to Cuba  aboard the slave ship  Tecora . True slave ships, such as  Tecora , were designed for the purpose of carrying  as many slaves as possible. One distinguishing feature was the half-height  between decks , which allowed slaves to be chained down in a sitting or lying  position, but which were not high enough to stand in, and thus were not  suitable for any other cargo. The crew of  La Amistad , lacking the slave  quarters, placed half the 53 captives in the hold, and the other half on deck. 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}