Stoichiometry and the Ideal Gas Law

Stoichiometry and the Ideal Gas Law - Stoichiometry and the...

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Stoichiometry and the Ideal Gas Law By Lionel Sims III Lab Instructor: Roy October 19, 2007
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Results and Discussion: An unknown nitrite salt was identified through a process that relied on the Ideal gas law. First 250 ml sulfamic acid and water is put in an Erlenmeyer flask. This is for the purpose of reacting with the unknown nitrite salt. Then 500 ml of water was placed in a Florence flask and an empty 600 ml beaker was put to the side. The two flasks were closed in an airtight system with a tube from the acid flask coming to a stop just above the water level in the Florence flask and another tube going from the bottom of the Florence flask to the beaker which was placed at the end to measure the displaced water. The system was checked for air bubbles and then the nitrite salt was partially dissolved to help with reactivity in the sulfamic acid then slowly mixed to facilitate the release of nitrogen gas. The displaced water was designed to represent the amount of nitrogen gas produced. After the experiment was complete, a set of equations and logical reasoning
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This lab report was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course CHEM 342132 taught by Professor Davis during the Spring '08 term at Cornell.

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Stoichiometry and the Ideal Gas Law - Stoichiometry and the...

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