PSYC471 FEB7th2008 NOTES

PSYC471 FEB7th2008 NOTES - PSYC471 Feb 7th, 2008 Sports...

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PSYC471 Feb 7 th , 2008 Sports Psychology & the Turino 2006 Winter Olympics T.As: Natasha Lekes : Natasha.lekes@gmail.com Nathalie Lacaille: nlacaille@yahoo.ca We over-rate the importance of innate talent Expertise is acquired via deliberate practice Apparent intellectual and anatomical advantages may in fact be result of deliberate practice that is extended over years Deliberate practice is relevant at all levels of expertise (i.e. incl. our daily lives) Sports Psychologists view of Ericsson and Charness (1994) article: -Sports psychology more expansive than what E & C would say - Ericsson : when did you start, how much do you train, etc. numerical value (accumulated deliberate practice hours) based on this, either – no chance/have a chance -Sports psychologists don’t like Ericsson’s theory: too much emphasis on deliberate practice and not enough emphasis on other things
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Terry Orlick’s Model of Sport Excellence Four basic human requirements for excellence 1) Talent (Natural) – a basic necessity but will not be enough to ensure excellence (Myriam Bedard example – had only 5 yrs of experience before 1992 Olympics) (Clara Hughes on natural endurance) 2) Effort – deliberate practice hard work (Canadian versus Chinese athletes: different amounts of hard work)
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PSYC471 FEB7th2008 NOTES - PSYC471 Feb 7th, 2008 Sports...

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