atomic spectra - Chrissy Henderson SI#: 17287266 Physics...

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Unformatted text preview: Chrissy Henderson SI#: 17287266 Physics 134 LAB 5, Wednesday 12:20 21 April 2005 1 I. Objective Throughout Lab 5, we will be studying the atomic spectra, consisting of white light when it is decomposed into its components of primary colors: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet, in order of decreasing wavelength. This is known as a continuous spectrum, and the color of light depends on the frequency ( f ). A line spectrum, on the other hand, occurs when elements of the periodic table are observed, seen as distinct lines. When light is diffracted, or sent through two or more narrow slits, the wavelengths can either reinforce one another or cancel each other out, depending on the phase of light. Using trigonometric functions, such as dsinθ = mλ , and a diffraction gradient, we can determine the wavelengths of light that each color is seen. In the first experiment, we will look at a continuous spectrum to find the minimum and maximum ranges corresponding to violet and red, respectively. We will then compare it to the accepted corresponding to violet and red, respectively....
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course PHYSICS 134 taught by Professor Hatch during the Fall '08 term at UMass (Amherst).

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atomic spectra - Chrissy Henderson SI#: 17287266 Physics...

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