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English 201 - Shakepspeare and Sonnets

English 201 - Shakepspeare and Sonnets - shame lust...

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William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Born April (23) 1564 marriage to Anne Hathaway in 1582, three children By 1592, in London as actor and known as playwright By 1597, father granted coat of arms, Shakespeare bought a house in Stratford, evidence of enough money and status to call himself a “gentleman” Wrote most of the plays between 1590-1611 (Twelfth Night around 1601) Around 1611, left theatre and returned to Stratford, died April 1616 Shakespeare’s Sonnets Published 1609, circulated as early as 1599 as manuscript Anti-Petrarchan sonnet tradition Bitterness, disillusionment Idolism of beautiful young man; and desire for dark (brunette) mistress Ideal of eternal love shaken by age, suspicion, jealousy,
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Unformatted text preview: shame, lust, betrayal • 3 quatrains and a couplet in iambic pentameter • Rhyme scheme: abab cdcd efef gg • “volta” (sharp turn in declaration) – occurs in final couplet Compare to Petrarchan tradition - How do Shakespeare's sonnets differ from traditional Petrarchan sonnets, such as Sidney's Astrophil and Stella ? If Shakespeare’s sonnet sequence has a coherent narrative structure, it seems to be: • 1-17 celebrates beauty of young man, urges him to marry and have children • 18-126 focus on young man, but also on theme of transience and destructive power of time, countered by permanence of poetry and love • After 126, the rest focus on the Dark Lady as an object of desire...
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