C9 Reading Guide - C9 Notecards Bedouins p.412 Nomadic Arabs from the central region of the Arabian Peninsula They herded sheep and camels in seasonal

C9 Reading Guide - C9 Notecards Bedouins p.412 Nomadic...

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C9 Notecards Bedouins p.412 Nomadic Arabs from the central region of the Arabian Peninsula. They herded sheep and camels in seasonal migrations. These peoples lived in fiercely independent clans and tribes, which often engaged in bitter blood feuds with another. They recognized a variety of gods, ancestors, and nature spirits; valued personal bravery, group loyalty, and hospitality; and greatly treasured their highly expressive oral poetry. Mecca p.413 A city that came to occupy a distinctive role in Arabia. The site of the Kaaba, the most prominent religious shrine in Arabia, which housed representations of some 360 deities and was the destination for many pilgrims. It's dominant tribe, the Quraysh, had come to access to the Kaaba and grew wealthy by taxing the local trade that accompanied the annual pilgrimage season. By the 6th century, it was home to people from various tribes and clans as well as an assortment of individual outlaws, exiles, refugees, and foreign merchants, but much of its growing wealth was concentrated in the hands of a few ruling Quraysh. Muhammad Ibn Abdullah p.414-415 The catalyst for the birth of the religion, Islam, was due to this individual, who was born in Mecca to a Quraysh family. A highly reflective man deeply troubled by the religious corruption and social inequalities of Mecca, he often undertook periods of withdrawal and meditation in the arid mountains outside the city. There, like the Buddha and Jesus, Muhammad had a powerful, overwhelming religious experience that left him convinced that he was Allah's messenger to the Arabs, commissioned to bring a scripture in their own language. As "the messenger of God," Muhammad presented himself in the line of earlier prophets-Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and many others. He was the last, "the seal of the prophets," bearing God's final revelation to humankind. Quran p.415 The book of sacred writings used in the Muslim religion, whose author was Muhammad Ibn Abdullah. Accepted by Muslims as revelations made to Muhammad by Allah through the angel Gabriel. Muhammad, began recording the revelations in 610, and continued periodically for the next 22 years. Those revelations were recorded in the Quran. Its unmatched poetic beauty, miraculous to Muslims, convinced many that it was indeed a revelation from God.

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