stats 8 Ch 9-10 - Stats 8 winter 2015(Baldi Midterm 2...

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History for 'Hwk4 ch9-10' Item: Hwk4 ch9-10 Score: 26/26100%(Calculated)scaled to 100/100100% Due: Sunday, October 25, 2015 10:30 PM Submitted: Sunday, October 25, 2015 8:56 PM Answers: 1. Indicate in the following examples whether the random variable Xis discrete or continuous. Explain your reasoning. Xis the number of petals on a randomly chosen daisy. Discrete. The variable can only take whole numbers. Discrete. The number of petals on a daisy can only be an even number. Continuous. The variable can take any positive value. Continuous. The daisy is randomly chosen. Discrete. Answers can only be whole numbers. Xis the stem length in centimeters of a randomly chosen daisy.
Score: 2 of 2 2. Government data assign a single cause for each death that occurs in the United States. The data show that, among persons aged 15 to 24 years, the probability is 0.41 that a randomly chosen death was an accident, 0.16 that it was a homicide, and 0.15 that it was a suicide. What is the sample space for the probability model of major causes of death based on the information you are given?
Do the categories accident and suicide cover all deaths? If not, what needs to be added to make a legitimate sample space (i.e., cover alldeath causes). What is the probability that a death was either an accident, a homicide, or a suicide? Give your answer to 2 decimal places (for ex., 0.12). Fill in the blank: Each death is determined to be from a single, primary cause, so causes are disjoint. That means you can add the given probabilities. What is the probability that the death was due to some other cause? Give you answer to 2 decimal places (for ex., 0.12). Fill in the blank: Probabilities must sum to 1. What proportion of deaths are notan accident, a homicide, or a suicide? Rule 4 says that probability an event does not happen
Score: 3 of 3
3. A survey by Gallup asked a random sample of American adults about their soda consumption.7 Let’s call X the number of glasses of soda consumed on a typical day. Gallup found the following probability model for X: Consider the events A = {number of glasses of soda is 1 or greater} B = {number of glasses of soda is 2 or less}

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