chap 6 explan notes - Anatomy Ch 6 Specialized tissue forming the bones osseous tissue The end of a long bone that is originally separated from the main

chap 6 explan notes - Anatomy Ch 6 Specialized tissue...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 20 pages.

Anatomy Ch 6 Specialized tissue forming the bones osseous tissue The end of a long bone that is originally separated from the main bone by a layer of cartilage but that later becomes united to the main bone through ossification epiphysis the cavity that contains bone marrow in the diaphysis of a long bone; called also medullary canal. marrow cavity the entrance for the nutrient artery of a bone nutrient foramen The disc of cartilage between the metaphysis and the epiphysis of an immature long bone permitting growth in length epiphyseal plate The line of junction of the epiphysis and diaphysis of a long bone where growth in length occurs epiphyseal line The thick fibrous membrane covering the entire surface of a bone except its articular cartilage and serving as an attachment for muscles and tendons periosteum a thin layer of connective tissue that lines the walls of the bone marrow cavities and haversian canals of compact bone and covers the trabeculae of cancellous bone. It has both osteogenic and hematopoietic potencies and, like the periosteum, takes an active part in the healing of fracture endosteum The cartilage covering the articular surfaces of the bones forming a synovial joint
Image of page 1
articular cartilage A central canal and the concentric osseous lamellae encircling it, occurring in compact bone. Also called haversian system osteon the nearly parallel layers of bone tissue found in compact bone lamellae the cavity, space, or depression in bone tissue. lacunae a very small tube or channel, such as the microscopic haversian canaliculi throughout bone tissue canaliculi canals in bone through which blood vessels pass perforating canals ... trabeculae The word osteoporosis literally means "porous bones." It occurs when bones lose an excessive amount of their protein and mineral content, particularly calcium. Over time, bone mass, and therefore bone strength, is decreased. As a result, bones become fragile and break easily. Even a sneeze or a sudden movement may be enough to break a bone in someone with severe osteoporosis. osteoporosis 1.Provide support by acting as a structural framework and a point of attachment for tendons and ligaments 2. Protect the internal organs (brain, chest, etc.) 3. Assist body movements (in conjunction with muscles) 4.Store and release salts of calcium and phosphorus 5. Participate in blood cell production (hematopoiesis) 6. Store triglycerides in adipose cells of yellow marrow= delicious soup
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 20 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture