2937630964

2937630964 - ABBREVIATED ALTERED VERSION FOR INSTRUCTIONAL...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ABBREVIATED, ALTERED VERSION FOR INSTRUCTIONAL USE ONLY: DO NOT CITE. To read the actual article—the write-up of the study that an undergraduate designed and conducted—follow this link . A shortened and simplified version (customized for undergraduates who have not yet completed a research methods class) begins on the next page.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Guns 1 Running head: GUNS, TESTOSTERONE, AND AGGRESSION Adapted Version of Guns, Testosterone, and Aggression: An Experimental Test of a Mediational Hypothesis Jennifer Klinesmith Tim Kasser Francis T. McAndrew Knox College
Background image of page 2
Guns 2 Abstract To test whether interacting with a handgun increases testosterone which, in turn, increases aggressive behavior, 30 college men (ages 18-22) provided a saliva sample (used to measure each man's testosterone level), interacted with either a gun or a children's game for 15 minutes, provided a second saliva sample, and then added as much hot sauce as they wanted to a cup of water that they thought another participant would be forced to drink. In support of the hypothesis that interacting with a handgun increases aggressive behavior, the men who interacted with the gun added more hot sauce to the water than the men who interacted with the game. In support of the hypothesis that testosterone partially mediates this gun-aggression relationship, (a) men who interacted with the handgun had greater increases in testosterone than those who interacted with the game, (b) increases in testosterone levels were correlated with increases in aggression, and (c) controlling for changes in testosterone reduced the gun- aggression correlation.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Guns 3 Guns, Testosterone, and Aggression: An Experimental Test of a Mediational Hypothesis The “weapons effect”—that merely seeing a weapon increases aggression—is well-documented (Anderson, Benjamin, & Bartholow, 1998; Bartholow, Anderson, Carnagey, & Benjamin, 2005; Berkowitz & LePage, 1967; Bettencourt & Kernahan, 1997; Killias & Haas, 2002). However, the physiological mechanism behind the weapons effect has not been investigated. Perhaps the hormone testosterone is the physiological trigger for the weapons effect. After all, for species ranging from chickens to monkeys, testosterone injections increase aggressiveness (Ellis, 1986). Furthermore, some laboratory and field studies involving human participants have also found strong positive relationships between testosterone and aggression (Archer, 1994; Campbell, Muncer, & Odber, 1997; Dabbs, Carr, Frady, & Riad, 1995; Dabbs, Jurkovic, & Frady, 1991). Thus, it may be that seeing a weapon triggers a surge in testosterone which, in turn, triggers aggression. Although some evidence suggests that surges in testosterone trigger aggression, there is no direct evidence that seeing a weapon triggers testosterone surges. However, some indirect evidence suggesting that seeing a weapons could trigger an increase in testosterone comes from research on the “challenge hypothesis” (Wingfield, Hegner, Dufty, & Ball, 1990). Originally developed to explain aggressive behavior in male pair-bonded birds, the challenge
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 13

2937630964 - ABBREVIATED ALTERED VERSION FOR INSTRUCTIONAL...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online