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Magnetic Field Due to a Solenoid

Magnetic Field Due to a Solenoid - Physics 202 Tuesday...

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Physics 202 Tuesday, April 6, 1999 Announcements: Lecture notes: Magnetic Field Due to a Solenoid A solenoid is a tightly wound helical coil of wire. See figures 30-17 and 30-18 on page 738 of the text for a picture. The magnetic field outside of a solenoid is very, very small. Refer to figure 30-20 from page 739 of the text for the following example To determine the magnitude of B inside the solenoid, draw an amperian loop as shown. o I(integral) B (dot product) ds = I (integral from a to b) B (dot product) ds + I (integral from b to c) B (dot product) ds + I (integral from c to d) B (dot product) ds + I (integral from d to a) B (dot product) ds o B = 0 outside of a solenoid, so I (integral from c to d) B (dot product) ds = 0 o I (integral from b to c) B (dot product) ds = I (integral from d to a) B (dot product) ds = 0 because the field is perpendicular to ds. o B is only found inside the solenoid, so I(integral) B (dot product) ds = I (integral from a to b) B (dot product) ds = μ o N i o But, I (integral from a to b) B (dot product) ds = Bh o Therefore, Bh = μ o
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