Psych 1000 Dreaming APA paper

Psych 1000 Dreaming APA paper - Dreaming 1 Dreaming Jessie...

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Dreaming 1 Dreaming Jessie A. Durham PSYCH 1000: Introduction to Psychology Section 3 Prof. Edward Fernandes East Carolina University 19 November 2007
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Dreaming 2 Dreaming Whether you can recall your dreams each night or not, they still happen. A dream is merely a memory of your dreaming experience, or what you remember the next morning. Or for a more complex understanding, a dream is “a report of a memory of a cognitive experience that happens under the kinds of conditions that are most frequently produced in a state called sleep” (Study of Dreams, 2007). So what exactly are dreams useful for? Or do they even provide any sole purpose at all? It was noted that in some societies dreams were used for many things. They were used to forecast the weather, find game, or even predict the future. In other societies, shamans used dreams to diagnose illnesses and enter the “spiritual” world. In our society, since about 1900, they have also been used in psychotherapy. (Purpose of Dreams, 1993) While at rest, your brain is reviewing and analyzing short term, long term, and spiritual memory. Emotions, thoughts, actions, ideas and interactions are all flowing around in your memory. These things along with other influences from your subconscious mind are processed, whether you know it or not, while you dream. (Basics about Dreaming, 2001) In order to dream, your brain has to reach the state in your sleep cycle where it is able to process thoughts and produce your dreaming to take place. While you sleep, you go through five different stages of sleep. Four of these stages make up your non-REM (NREM) sleep, while the fifth stage is your REM sleep. The length of time it takes for an individual to fall asleep each night varies from person to person despite physical, mental or emotional aspects that could have affected them earlier that day. On average it takes an individual approximately 25 minutes to fall asleep. (How Stuff Works, 2007) Before discussing the different cycles of sleep, an important factor to understand is that of the brain waves being taken place while asleep and while awake. The brain cycles through four different types of brain waves. The different types represent the different speeds that the electrical voltages are
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Dreaming 3 going at in the brain. The slowest speed is known as delta, and occurs during your deepest sleep. While in your lightest stage of sleep, or stage one, theta brain waves are oscillating. The next type is the alpha brain waves that occur during REM sleep and while you are awake. Lastly, the beta waves which signify the fastest cycles are normally only seen when an individual is in the middle of a very stressful situation while awake. (How Stuff Works, 2007) The first stage of your NREM sleep is the “light sleep” stage or the shortest stage and normally lasts anywhere from one to seven minutes. During this stage, your breathing, heart rate, muscle activity and body temperature decline. Your muscles are also more likely to twitch in this stage
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course PSYCH 1000 taught by Professor Erikkson during the Spring '08 term at East Carolina University .

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Psych 1000 Dreaming APA paper - Dreaming 1 Dreaming Jessie...

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