AMH2020_Section_1 - SECTION 1 RECONSTRUCTION ESSENTIAL...

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Essentials of Business Law and the Legal Environment
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Chapter 11 / Exercise 02
Essentials of Business Law and the Legal Environment
Mann
Expert Verified
SECTION 1: RECONSTRUCTIONESSENTIAL QUESTIONS: 1. What were the differences between Lincoln’s plans for the South after the war, as opposed to what actually happened? Did his assassination factor into these differences? 2. Who were the Radical Republicans? Did their influence positively or negatively affect the outcome of Reconstruction? 3.In what ways was Reconstruction considered a success? How was it considered a failure? LINCOLN’S TEN PERCENT PLANTen Percent Plan – Issued in December 1863, the plan allowed that a state could be reintegratedinto the Union when ten percent of the population took an allegiance to the U.S. and pledged to uphold emancipation. Voters could then elect delegates to draft revised state constitutions and establish new state governments. All southerners except for high-ranking Confederate army officers and government officials would be granted a full pardon. LINCOLN’S SECOND INAUGRAL ADDRESS“If God wills that every last drop of blood spilled with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword.” “With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.” 1. What does Lincoln mean with this statement? 2.From this reading what can you tell was Lincoln’s views on citizenship during Reconstruction? Frederick Douglass (1818 – 1895) - An African-American social reformer, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery, he became a leader of the abolitionist movement, gainingnote for his dazzling oratory and incisive antislavery writing, as well as working closely with President Abraham Lincoln.LINCOLN ASSASSINATIONFord’s Theater – A historic theatre in Washington, D.C., used for various stage performances beginning in the 1860s. It is also the site of the assassination of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. After being shot, the fatally wounded president was carried across the street tothe Petersen House, where he died the next morning. John Wilkes Booth (1838 – 1865) – Was an popular stage actor who assassinated President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre. Booth was a member of the prominent 19th-century Booth theatrical family from Maryland and, by the 1860s, was a well-known actor. He was also a Confederate sympathizer, vehement in his denunciation of Lincoln, and strongly opposed the abolition of slavery in the United States.
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Essentials of Business Law and the Legal Environment
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Chapter 11 / Exercise 02
Essentials of Business Law and the Legal Environment
Mann
Expert Verified
Edwin Stanton (1814 – 1869) – Lincoln’s Secretary of War, and de facto leader of the U.S. Government on the night of April 14, 1865. Stanton's effective management helped organize the massive military resources of the North and guide the Union to victory. He also organized the manhunt for Lincoln's killer, John Wilkes Booth. After Lincoln's assassination, Stanton remained as the Secretary of War under the new President Andrew Johnson during the first years of Reconstruction. He opposed the lenient policies of Johnson towards the former Confederate States. Johnson's attempt to dismiss Stanton ultimately led to President Johnson being impeachedby the House of Representatives.William Seward (1801 - 1872) – Lincoln’s Secretary of State; permanently disfigured after an attempt on his life on the night of Lincoln’s assassination. Also as Secretary of State under Johnson, purchased the territory of Alaska from Russia.

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