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Journal REVIEW of RESEARCH ARTICLEDionne SteinI.Author(s)of the Journal Article:Wyant, BrianTitle of the Journal Article:Financial Barriers and Utilization of Medical Services in Prison: AnExamination of Co- payments, Personal Assets, and Individual CharacteristicsDate and Name of the Journal: (2018, November).Journal for Evidence-based Practice inCorrectional Health, 2(1) 97-127.II.Purpose of the Study:The purpose of the research study was to find if requiringincarcerated individuals to pay fees for medical service decreases use.There are stillimportant unanswered questions about this association: 1) To what extent do thoseincarcerated view medical co-payments fees as barriers to seeking medical care? 2)What individual factors are associated with viewing the copayment fee as prohibitiveto seeking medical care?III.Theory Guiding the ResearchnoneIV.Hypothesis:Those who desire to go to sick call, that those with fewer financial resources (having less moneyin their bank accounts, not receiving financial support from others, or not having a prison job)would perceive the $5 dollar copayment as a barrier to seeking health care.Participants with more financial resources (those who could afford amenities such as cable TV,and tobacco or snacks from the commissary) have discretionary money, and thus could afford thecopayment.V.Empirical StudiesResearch studies discussing the quality and access to medical care in correctional institutions by(Friedman, 1992 & (Rold, 1996) discuss the U.S., the Supreme Court ruling is that incarceratedpersons are constitutionally protected to receive treatment when medically needed and denyingmedical care would amount to “deliberate indifference,” violating the Eighth Amendment of theU.S. Constitution.The question of who pays as discussed by (Shields, 1995) is still in question. As discussed by(Quinn, 2009 & Awofeso, 2005a) states or the Department of Corrections can make lawsrequiring the incarcerated person help pay for their medical care without being denied careregardless of financial ability to pay.
Colorado inCollins v. Romer962 F.2d 1508 (1992) argued forcing incarcerated to pay a feeforced them to choose between a services or hygiene products (Rold, 1996) fees were assessedonly when a request to see a doctor were imposed. (Reynolds v. Wagner– 936 F. Supp. 1216,1996) argued he could not afford to pay the fee, sacrificing or delaying his medical treatmentalthough he was able to buy candy. Again, court concluded that small co-payments did not delaymedical care (Quinn, 2009).Many studies have discussed co-payments for incarcerated individuals by some state correctionalinstitutions for an aging prison population and general rising health care costs (Hyde andBrumfield, 2003). There have been arguments presented against (e.g., Awofeso, 2005b &Gottschalk, 2014) co-payments the trend has been for them to pay a portion of their health care(Anno, 2004).

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Term
Spring
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NoProfessor
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Health care provider

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