LIA_lesson1_9.28.05 (4) - Un i t Little Ice Age Lesson 1...

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Time: Introduction: 30 minData collection: 10 minutes daily (for one or more weeks)Part 1 graphing/analy-sis: 45 min Part 2 graphing/analy-sis: 45 minMaterials for the Teacher:ThermometerA copy of the Weather Data Student Page for each day of data collec-tion Overhead plot of aver-age monthly tempera-ture for your region (see Advanced Preparation)Overhead table of aver-aged climate data for region for period of data collection (average daily temperatures, mini-mums, maximums) (see )Internet access requiredMaterials for Students:Graph paper PencilsColored pencils (recommended)Transparency (optional)Unit:Little Ice AgeLesson: 1Materials & PreparationSourceAdapted from Global Climates - Past, Present, and Future. EPA Report No. EPA/600/R-93/126 and Project LEARN () and recommended by Sandra Henderson.National Science StandardsScience as Inquiry: Content Standard AEarth and Space Science: Content Standard D Colorado Science StandardsScience: 1, 4.2, 6Math: 3Learning GoalsStudents willLearn to collect and graph local weather dataUnderstand the general distinctions between weather and climateUnderstand that daily weather measurements are highly variable com-pared to long-term climate dataWhat Students Do in this LessonUnderstanding and interpreting local weather data and understanding the relationship between weather and climate are important first steps to understanding larger-scale global climate changes. In this activity, students will collect weather data over several days or weeks, graph temperature data, and compare the temperature data collected with averaged climate data where they live.Key ConceptsWeather is the current atmospheric conditions, including temperature, rainfall, wind, and humidity, while climate is the general weather condi-tions. Comparing daily temperature with averaged climate data, students will understand that weather is highly variable, but climate is not. Scientists need a lot of data to average and understand regional climates or the usual conditions. To detect a change in climate, scientists need large amounts of data. They look for evidence of climate that existed long before humans made weather measurements. These climate records, including ice cores, lake bottom sediments, and tree rings, are called proxies. They are discussed in several of the activities that follow in this unit of the Cli-mate Discovery Teacher Guide.© 2005 UCAR, Version 1
Advanced PreparationFamiliarize yourself with the procedure for using your thermometers to collect atmospheric temperature data.Determine how long you want students to collect weather data (a week, month, or even all year). Depending on your regional climate, one week of data collection can be sufficient to illustrate weather variation (and may be more appropriate for younger students).

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