notes 2

Notes 2 - notations for chapter 5 Chapter 5 begins with a discussion of evaluation of"quality in art and gives as the first 2 examples a

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notations for chapter 5 Chapter 5 begins with a discussion of evaluation of "quality" in art, and gives as the first 2 examples a self-portrait of Elizabeth Vigee-Lebrun, and a painting by a self-taught artist called "Shy Glance." The latter is in a museum called "The Museum of Bad Art," and shows little knowledge of anatomy and the use of light and shadow. Vigee-Lebrun, on the other hand, was an accomplished portrait painter in the last quarter of the eighteenth century, and was most famous as the court painter of Marie Antionette, wife of Louis XVI of France. Her style could be classified as "Rococo," as she is best known for (literally hundreds) of paintings of the rich and famous of the courts of Europe. After the French Revolution, she had to flee France, and she went to the Imperial courts of Vienna and St. Petersburg. Another work presented in Chapter 5 is a Pieta by Titian, a Venetian Renaissance artist. He lived a long time, and had a long and successful career, becoming the most sought-after portrait painter after the death of Raphael. The Pieta is a late work, done in Titian's old age, and shows a loose brushwork that wasn't seen in his earlier works, which may be a result of loss of manual dexterity (arthritis?) or failing eyesight. The social context of the Pieta is that it was painted during one of Venice's many bouts of the plague, and be a plea in paint for the Virgin to intercede and save the city from the ravages of the plague. Or, as the textbook suggests, it may be offered as a solace to some of the people who have lost loved ones to the plague, reminding them of the expectation of resurrection to believers. "Umar Slays a Dragon" is a book illustration painted for an illiterate ruler who liked to have tales illustrated as they were read to him. Ni Zan's "Six Gentlemen (Six Trees)," suggests the isolation of an artist who refused to work for foreign masters. In each case, we have a reference to a political environment for each artist. The three basic types of criticism are: Formal - a description of how a work is made, such as the artist's use of line, color, space, and other elements of art, as well as how the work relates to earlier styles Sociocultural - explores the economic, cultural, and political influences at the time (who is in power, is the artist in favor of or against the ruling party; is the artist expressing sympathy for the downtrodden; is there some current or recent disaster referred to in the artwork, like a plague, fire, or flood) Expressive - involves the skill level, personal intent, mental state, gender, or mindset of the artist. Could refer to an "old age style," of an artist near death, or to a feminist sensibility as seen in the work of Artemesia Gentileschi. Notations for Chapter 5 and STYLE
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course ART 1001 taught by Professor Zucker during the Spring '07 term at LSU.

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Notes 2 - notations for chapter 5 Chapter 5 begins with a discussion of evaluation of"quality in art and gives as the first 2 examples a

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