Printmaking Processes notes for exam 2

Printmaking Processes notes for exam 2 - Printmaking...

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Printmaking Processes printmaking processes, #1 RELIEF prints are mainly represented by WOODCUTS or WOODBLOCKS (both terms used interchangeably), and Linocuts, or Linoleum cuts. WOODCUTS - the artist draws or traces a drawing on a smooth, flat piece of wood. He then cuts (with a knife) along the edges of his lines. The next step is to use a chisel to remove a layer of the wood between the lines. When he's finished this process, he has a raised picture (in relief) on the surface of the block. He applies ink to the raised wood, lays a piece of paper over it, and presses the paper to the block (by hand, or using a printing press). Pull the paper away to reveal the print, a reverse copy of the image on the wood. The artist who effectively reinvented the woodcut was Albrecht Durer, the German Northern Renaissance artist. When we looked at painting, we learned that he was the first artist to make completed individual works of art in watercolor. So he invented or redefined two mediums, watercolor and woodcut. You can remember this easily by the following mnemonic device: On the exam, his name will be spelled correctly, with two dots above the "u" in his name (I can't do it here because this program doesn't do accent marks.) So remember the two dots over the u (double-u) and you'll remember the two "w's," woodcut and watercolor. INTAGLIO - there are several techniques for producing intaglio prints. The first is
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Printmaking Processes notes for exam 2 - Printmaking...

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