CH 4 - Chapter 4 The Major Classes of Chemical Reactions...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 4 The Major Classes of Chemical Reactions
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Major Classes of Chemical Reactions 4.6 Elements in Redox Reactions 4.1 The Role of Water as a Solvent 4.2 Writing Equations for Aqueous Ionic Reactions 4.3 Precipitation Reactions 4.4 Acid-Base Reactions 4.5 Oxidation-Reduction (Redox) Reactions 4.7 Reversible Reactions: An Introduction to Chemical Equilibrium
Background image of page 2
Figure 4.1 Electron distribution in molecules of H 2 and H 2 O.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 4.2 The dissolution of an ionic compound.
Background image of page 4
Figure 4.3 The electrical conductivity of ionic solutions.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sample Problem 4.1 Determining Moles of Ions in Aqueous Ionic Solutions PROBLEM: How many moles of each ion are in the following solutions? (a) 5.0 mol of ammonium sulfate dissolved in water (b) 78.5 g of cesium bromide dissolved in water (c) 7.42x10 22 formula units of copper(II) nitrate dissolved in water (d) 35 mL of 0.84 M zinc chloride SOLUTION: PLAN: We have to relate the information given and the number of moles of ions present when the substance dissolves in water. (a) (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 ( s ) 2NH 4 + ( aq ) + SO 4 2- ( aq ) 5.0 mol (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 2 mol NH 4 + 1 mol (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 = 10. mol NH 4 + 5.0 mol SO 4 2- H 2 O
Background image of page 6
Sample Problem 4.1 Determining Moles of Ions in Aqueous Ionic Solutions continued 78.5 g CsBr mol CsBr 212.8 g CsBr = 0.369 mol CsBr = 0.369 mol Cs + = 0.369 mol Br - (b) CsBr( s ) Cs + ( aq ) + Br - ( aq ) 7.42x10 22 formula units Cu(NO 3 ) 2 mol Cu(NO 3 ) 2 6.022x10 23 formula units = 0.123 mol Cu(NO 3 ) 2 = 0.123 mol Cu 2+ = 0.246 mol NO 3 - (c) Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ( s ) Cu 2+ ( aq ) + 2NO 3 - ( aq ) 35 mL ZnCl 2 1L 10 3 mL = 2.9x110 -2 mol ZnCl 2 (d) ZnCl 2 ( aq ) Zn 2+ ( aq ) + 2Cl - ( aq ) 0.84 mol ZnCl 2 L = 2.9x110 -2 mol Zn 2+ = 5.8x10 -2 mol Cl - H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 4.4 The hydrated proton.
Background image of page 8
Sample Problem 4.2 Determining the Molarity of H + Ions in Aqueous Solutions of Acids PROBLEM: Nitric acid is a major chemical in the fertilizer and explosives industries. In aqueous solution, each molecule dissociates and the H becomes a solvated H + ion. What is the molarity of H + ( aq ) in 1.4M nitric acid? PLAN: SOLUTION: Use the formula to find the molarity of H + . One mole of H + ( aq ) is released per mole of nitric acid (HNO 3 ) HNO 3 ( l ) H + ( aq ) + NO 3 - ( aq ) 1.4M HNO 3 ( aq ) should have 1.4M H + ( aq ). H 2 O
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Writing Equations for Aqueous Ionic Reactions The molecular equation shows all of the reactants and products as intact, undissociated compounds. The total ionic equation shows all of the soluble ionic substances dissociated into ions. The net ionic equation eliminates the spectator ions and shows the actual chemical change taking place.
Background image of page 10
Figure 4.5 A precipitation reaction and its equation.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 4.7 The reaction of Pb(NO 3 ) 2 and NaI. double displacement reaction
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/16/2008 for the course CHE 1103 taught by Professor Ermler during the Spring '08 term at The University of Texas at San Antonio- San Antonio.

Page1 / 42

CH 4 - Chapter 4 The Major Classes of Chemical Reactions...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online