Arch review - Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe(May 1 1764 September 3 1820 was a Britishborn American architect best known for his design of the United

Arch review - Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe(May 1 1764...

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Benjamin Henry Boneval Latrobe (May 1, 1764 – September 3, 1820) was a British- born American architect best known for his design of the United States Capitol , as well as his design of the Baltimore Basilica , the first Catholic Cathedral built in the United States. Latrobe came to the United States in 1796, settling first in Virginia and then relocating to Philadelphia where he set up his practice. In 1803, he was hired as Surveyor of the Public Buildings of the United States, and spent much of the next fourteen years working on projects in Washington, D.C. Later in his life, Latrobe worked on a waterworks project in New Orleans , where he died in 1820 from yellow fever . He has been called the "Father of American Architecture". Greek Revival in America Latrobe brought from England influences of British Neo-classicalism, and was able to combine it with styles introduced by Thomas Jefferson, to devise an American Greek Revival style. John Summerson described the Bank of Pennsylvania, as an example of how Latrobe "married English Neo-Classicism to Jeffersonian Neo-Classicism [and] ... from that moment, the classical revival in America took on a national form". [76] [77] The American form of Greek Revival architecture that Latrobe developed became associated with political ideals of democracy —meaning that was less apparent in Britain. [76] Richard Morris Hunt ( October 31 , 1827 July 31 , 1895 ) was an American architect of the nineteenth century and a preeminent figure in the history of American architecture . Hunt was, according to design critic Paul Goldberger writing in The New York Times , "American architecture's first, and in many ways its greatest, statesman." [1] Aside from Hunt's sculpting of the face of New York City , including designs for the facade and Great Hall of the Metropolitan Museum of Art , the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty and many Fifth Avenue mansions lost to the wrecking ball, [2] Hunt founded both the American Institute of Architects and the Municipal Art Society . The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport , Rhode Island , United States on the Atlantic Ocean . It is a National Historic Landmark , a contributing property to the Bellevue Avenue Historic District , and is owned and operated by the Preservation Society of Newport County . The Breakers was built as the Newport summer home of Cornelius Vanderbilt II , a member of the wealthy United States Vanderbilt family . Erected in 1883 and entered into the National Register of Historic Places in 1975, the red- brick building features dormer windows and a mansard roof similar to those Hunt used on his Biltmore Estate in Asheville, North Carolina, pictured below on this page. This popular youth hostel was originally built for the Association for the Relief of Respectable Aged Indigent Females, a charity created in 1813 with the help of financier Peter G.
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