Ch6-text

Ch6-text - Chapter 6: Motown Pop and Southern Soul...

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Chapter 6: Motown Pop and Southern Soul (1960–1970) II. Motown: Black music for white audiences 0. Gordy formed Motown Records in 1959 and patterned many songs after other successful records 0. First hit was in 1960, Barrett Strong's “Money (That's What I Want)” (p23 r2) 1. The Marvelettes' “Please Mr. Postman” (p1, r1, 1961) draws from Brill Building “girl group” style 2. By the Contours’ “Do You Love Me” (p3 r1, 1962) resembles the Isley Brothers' style II. Motown: Black music for white audiences (continued) 1. Gordy knew that the best commercial potential was in crossover records 3. From rhythm and blues to pop 4. He used the same approach as Chuck Berry: the original version would become the crossover 5. That eliminated the need (or opportunity) for other labels to cover the records 6. This concept brought huge financial rewards 7. Records generally charted higher on the rhythm and blues charts but pop was always close II. Motown: Black music for white audiences (continued) 2. Gordy studied the successful models and used them in his own company 8. The Leiber and Stoller idea of songwriters producing their songs had worked 9. That idea had been adopted by the Brill Building successfully so Gordy employed it in Motown 10. The original Motown songwriter-producer team from 1960 to 1964 included 0. Gordy 1. William “Mickey” Stevenson 2. William “Smokey” Robinson II. Motown: Black music for white audiences (continued) 3. This team is responsible for several early hits 11. The first Miracles hit “Shop Around” (p2 r1, 1960) 12. Written by Gordy and Robinson, produced by Gordy 4. Robinson wrote and produced several hits for Motown singer Mary Wells from 1962 to 1964: 13. “The One Who Really Loves You” (p8 r2, 1962) 14. “You Beat Me to the Punch” (p9 r1, 1962) 15. “Two Lovers” (p7 r1, 1962) 16. “My Guy” (p1, 1964)
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II. Motown: Black music for white audiences (continued) 5. Quality Control—Motown style 17. Recordings were produced in two adjoining Detroit houses called “Hitsville, USA” 18. Gifted and experienced studio musicians helped producers craft their arrangements 3. Similar to Phil Spector’s “wrecking crew” 4. Musicians were talented jazz musicians, adept at improvising and spontaneous “arranging” 5. Holland-Dozier-Holland sessions frequently began with only sparse musical directions 19. A core group of musicians were at the center of the production process II. Motown: Black music for white audiences (continued) 6. They played on most of the recordings 20. Pianist Earl Van Dyke 21. Drummer Bennie Benjamin 22. Electric bassist James Jamerson 7. They were the studio band, “the Funk Brothers,” responsible for the mid-1960s “Motown sound” II. Motown: Black music for white audiences (continued) 8. In 2003 a documentary was produced about the Funk Brothers 23. Standing in the Shadows of Motown 24. The film featured interviews with surviving members of the studio band 25. Attention was finally focused on the musicians who were so
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Ch6-text - Chapter 6: Motown Pop and Southern Soul...

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