Ch10-text

Ch10-text - Chapter 10 Mainstream Rock Punk and New...

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Chapter 10: Mainstream Rock, Punk, and New Wave (1975–1980) I. 1970s rock evolved into big business 0. Early 1970s rock based on the hippie aesthetic shifted to economic concerns 0. Rock musicians began creating mass appeal music 0. Goal became how much money could be made 0. Less emphasis on sincerity and creativity 0. Much early 1970s effort was put into developing psychedelic era creative ideas 0. The second half of the 1970s saw a consolidation of earlier mainstream styles I. 1970s rock evolved into big business (continued) 0. FM radio shifted from free-form 1960s approach to AOR 0. Album cuts became the norm 0. Big advertising money was at stake 0. Stations played what would generate high advertising rates I. 1970s rock evolved into big business (continued) 0. Advertising rates are based on several aspects 0. How many listeners a station has 0. Who listens to their station 0. Age of listeners 0. Listeners’ income 0. How long they listen before they switch to another station 0. Advertising concerns can affect what music gets played I. 1970s rock evolved into big business (continued) 0. By the late 1970s stations were heavily formatted 0. Program directors or consultants calling the shots 0. Disk-jockeys choosing less of the music 0. Long tracks were no longer considered “radio friendly” 0. Did not leave enough time for commercials 0. Listeners would change the channel 0. The ideal length for a radio friendly track was about four to five minutes
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I. 1970s rock evolved into big business (continued) 0. Major corporations invested in the music business 0. Music from the last half of the decade was designed specifically for radio play 0. Steady growth of hippie culture fueled growth of the rock-music business in the early 1970s 0. Realization that an unimaginable amount of money could be made 0. Emergence of the goal to create the “big album” 0. Before 1975 album sales of 300,000 to 500,000 units was considered good II. The quest for the “Big Album” 0. Peter Frampton 0. Early in 1976, Peter Frampton's live album, Frampton Comes Alive , exceeded all expectations 0. Sold millions rather than thousands of copies 0. His first two albums had respectable sales 0. His third and fourth releases did better 0. d. Something's Happening (p25, 1974) 0. e. Frampton (p32, 1975) II. The quest for the “Big Album” (continued) 0. 2. Frampton Comes Alive hit number one on the U.S. album charts (uk6) in 1976 0. A live album 0. Marked the beginning of corporate investment in the music business 0. The album contained hit tracks 0. “Show Me the Way” (p6 uk10) 0. “Baby, I Love Your Way” (p12 uk43) 0. “Do You Feel Like We Do” (p19 uk39) Peter Frampton, “Show Me the Way” #6 on the Billboard charts in 1976 Form: Contrasting verse-chorus 0:00-0:33 Introduction Strummed acoustic guitar opens the song as band comes in after first four bars, first in stop time, then in regular time.
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0:33-1:09 Verse 1 Lead vocal enters with two 8-bar phrases, followed by 4 bars
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Ch10-text - Chapter 10 Mainstream Rock Punk and New...

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