Ch5-Text

Ch5-Text - Chapter 5: American Responses to the British...

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Chapter 5: American Responses to the British Invasion I Folk rock begins with Bob Dylan *Bob Dylan in 1964 *Well known in the folk music community *Relatively unknown to the commercial pop mainstream audience *Folk artists weren’t part of the “singles” end of the music industry *They were known for their albums of folk songs I Folk rock begins with Bob Dylan (continued) *Built his style around that of Woody Guthrie *Early Dylan songs dealt with social issues *“Blowin’ in the Wind” addressed civil rights issues *“Masters of War” was about the newly erupting Vietnam I Folk rock begins with Bob Dylan (continued) *Eventually Dylan began addressing more personal ideas *He put his talent for crafting lyrics into these relationship-driven topics *These lyrics were far more poetic than Brill Building songs *His second, third, and fourth albums were commercial successes in America and England I Folk rock begins with Bob Dylan (continued) *Dylan after 1964 *He’d been interested in using electric instruments but wasn’t satisfied with early attempts *The Byrds released an electric version of his “Mr. Tambourine Man” in 1965 *The Byrds used a Rickenbacker electric 12-string guitar for the hook and accompaniment *George Harrison is seen playing one in A Hard Day’s Night *Dylan liked what he heard *Decided to try electric instruments again I Folk rock begins with Bob Dylan (continued) Bringin' It All Back Home (p6 uk1, 1965) was half electric and half acoustic *He next released a single that became a hit: “Subterranean Homesick Blues” (p39 uk9, 1965) *Electric Dylan and the Newport folk festival controversy *Dylan appeared at Newport in July of 1965 using electric instruments on some songs *Folk purists accused him of selling out to the pop mainstream I Folk rock begins with Bob Dylan (continued)
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* “Positively 4th Street” (p7 uk8, 1965) *An angry song *What he called a “finger pointing” song *He used this metaphor in his songs about social injustice and pointed out the perpetrators *In this song he was accusing the folk music establishment of unfair criticism *He’s obviously angry and takes up twelve verses to express it. I The Byrds *The first international folk rock hit was the Byrds’ recording of Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man” (p1 uk1, 1965) *Byrds were formed in Los Angeles in 1964 *Their trademark sound was instantly recognizable *Rich textured harmonized vocals utilizing full and falsetto voices *The sparkling electric 12-string *They recorded rock versions of folk songs and originals *Their first album was titled Mr. Tambourine Man (p6 uk7, 1965), *Total of four covers of Dylan songs *They covered a Pete Seeger song, “Turn, Turn, Turn” (p1 uk26, 1966) I The Byrds
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course HIST 1120 taught by Professor Grigg during the Spring '08 term at UNO.

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Ch5-Text - Chapter 5: American Responses to the British...

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