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Ch9-text - Chapter 9: Black Pop and the Rise of Disco...

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Chapter 9: Black Pop and the Rise of Disco (1970–1980) II. Black pop roots in the 1960s 0. Sly and the Family Stone 0. Sly and the Family Stone had an important influence on black pop at the end of the 1960s 0. His music was important to many black musicians 0. His music was a blend of funk with aspects of psychedelia 0. Helped define black pop for white listeners in the early 1970s as well II. Black pop roots in the 1960s (continued) 0. Band had a series of crossover hit singles 0. “Dance to the Music” (p8 r9, 1968) 0. “Everyday People” (p1 r1, 1969) 0. “Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)” (p1 r1, 1970) 0. “Family Affair” (p1 r1, 1971) 0. During the mid 1960s Sly Stone (Sylvester Stewart) was a disk- jockey and record producer II. Black pop roots in the 1960s (continued) 0. Became involved in the San Francisco psychedelic music scene 0. Blended black and white music styles together 0. Racially and sexually integrated band 0. Early songs were upbeat dance-oriented songs 0. Exemplified by “Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)” 0. Repeating bass riff established “groove” (rhythmic feel) 0. That bass riff is the key to the song’s effectiveness—typical of Sly’s music AX026242.jpg Sly and the Family Stone, “Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)” #1 on both Billboard Pop and Rhythm and Blues charts in 1970 0. Form : Simple Verse-Chorus 0. 0:00-0:18 Introduction Groove established 0. 0:18-0:54 Verse 1 Unison Vocals “Lookin’ at the devil…” 0. 0:54-1:12 Chorus Harmony added to vocal part
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0. 1:12-1:21 Interlude Bass drops out and leaves guitar and drums only 0. 1:21-1:57 Verse 2 As before, but with horns fading in and out to create a train-whistle effect. “Stiff all in the collar…” 0. 1:57-2:15 Chorus As before with horn line added. “Thank you. .” 0. 2:15-2:24 Interlude As before 0. 2:24-3:01 Verse 3 As in verse 2 with slightly busier accompaniment filling in between vocal phrases. “Dance to the music…” 0. 3:01-3:19 Chorus As before, with horns. “Thank you…” 0. 3:19-3:37 Contrasting A new verse over same music. Trebly tone Verse in the vocals add timbral effect. “Flamin’ eyes…” 0. 3:37-3:55 Chorus As before, with horns. “Thank you…” 0. 3:55-4:13 Chorus As before with horns 0. 4:13-4:32 Chorus As before and fade out IV. Motown continues into the 1970s 0. The Temptations 0. The Temptations went through changes in 1968 0. Lead singer David Ruffin was replaced by Dennis Edwards in 1968 0. Producer Norman Whitfield collaborated with writer Barrett Strong 0. Influenced by Sly and the Family Stone 0. “Cloud Nine” (p6 r2, 1968) exemplifies that influence IV. Motown continues into the 1970s (continued) 0. “Papa Was a Rolling Stone” (p1 r5, 1972) 0. Dramatic and atmospheric 0. Focuses on problems within black urban life 0. String arrangement by Paul Riser 0. Whitfield's finest achievement as a producer 0. Built over a single repeated bass line 0. Almost seven minutes in length
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course HIST 1120 taught by Professor Grigg during the Spring '08 term at UNO.

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Ch9-text - Chapter 9: Black Pop and the Rise of Disco...

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